Brussels

While the focus has been on how Tory backbenchers will vote on a Brexit deal, pro-Europeans on the opposition benches will face a crucial dilemma too

For politicians, compromise can be a surprisingly hard word. So it is today over the Brexit endgame. The talk is still of crashing out, no deals and blood red lines. But this is paradoxical. Politics, like life itself, is mostly built on compromises. That is why the Brexit sherpas are, in fact, still talking in Brussels and London. Even on Brexit, it remains likelier than not that the practical human instinct to compromise will eventually have its way.

This is not, though, the certainty it ought logically to be. Brexit is not simply another political process to be settled through compromise. To many, it is also a series of absolutes. One is that Britain’s vote to leave the European Union was not just decisive but the immutable will of an entire people that cannot be questioned – or compromised. A second, never properly understood in Westminster, is that the EU sees leaving as a treaty process governed by rules that cannot be bent.

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Source:: from www.theguardian.com

Brussels

PM says deal can be achieved ‘by working closely’, before making case to EU leaders

Theresa May has said “very good progress” has been made on Brexit since the ill-tempered Salzburg summit last month, as she arrived in Brussels for talks with EU leaders and urged both sides to work “intensively” in the coming days.

The prime minister shrugged off the setbacks of last weekend and gave a defiantly upbeat assessment of the outlook for a deal after a brief meeting with the EU commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker.

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Source:: from www.theguardian.com

Charlotte Higgins

The Booker winner delivers more insight into the estrangement of a society from itself than most of our MPs could muster

Today, very few British politicians admit to reading novels, let alone make a virtue of the fact – although Scottish first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, is a notable exception, and Jeremy Corbyn has named Ulysses as his favourite book. Perhaps Theresa May’s cabinet is full of secret bookworms. Somehow, I doubt it. But if there is one book that all British politicians ought to read right now, it is this week’s Man Booker prize winner.

Milkman, the third novel by Anna Burns, offers both an unnerving reminder of very recent Northern Irish history and a meticulous account of an oppressive relationship between an 18-year-old woman and a 41-year-old man. The novel, part of a Man Booker shortlist chosen at least partly for the book’s ability to parse the confusing state we’re in, holds up to the light two of the most pressing political and cultural questions of the moment – the Irish border and #MeToo.

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Source:: from www.theguardian.com

John Crace

The PM found no friend in sight. Then she looked across the dispatch box and relaxed

Theresa May checked her reflection in the mirror. No love lost there. She still hated herself. Hated the person she had become, hated the job she was doing. When she had first become prime minister, she had felt almost complete. But now she was little more than a hollowed-out shell, almost unrecognisable even to herself.

Brexit had poisoned her from within. She knew it was a terrible mistake – she had always known that – and everything she touched now turned to dust around her. She wasn’t even making the best of a bad job. She was doing a bad job badly. Most mornings she would lie under the duvet, willing time to stand still. She carried on merely because it was less humiliating than not carrying on. Stubbornness disguised as a misplaced sense of duty.

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Source:: from www.theguardian.com

French government

Government publishes draft bill outlining areas of concern relating to hard Brexit

The French government has said a no-deal Brexit would leave Britons needing visas to visit France and put UK nationals already living there in an “irregular” legal situation.

It has published a draft bill aimed at addressing the consequences of the UK crashing out of the EU without any agreement. British citizens living in France would immediately become “third-country nationals”, preventing them from holding certain jobs and limiting access to healthcare and welfare, and passenger travel and freight movements across the Channel would be delayed.

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Source:: from www.theguardian.com

European Union

As leaders from different political traditions in Britain, we are united in defending shared European values

It would be an understatement to say that the negotiations to take Britain out of the European Union have not gone well.

For all the promises made during the referendum, the advocates of leaving the EU both underestimated the fundamental importance of Britain’s integration into the European-wide economy and failed to explain the sacrifices that Brexit inevitably involves.

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Source:: from www.theguardian.com

House of Commons

There are no excuses when the party has the chance to bring down the government, or even stop Brexit

For all the huffing and puffing, for all the complex games of bluff over the Irish border and the transition period, the important facts of the Brexit deal remain relatively simple. Between the red lines of the DUP, the Tory right and the Tories’ liberal wing, there ought to be no deal which can get a majority in the House of Commons. This situation should bring down the government, or stop Brexit from taking place, or both.

The only way that Theresa May can be sure of delivering a majority is with Labour assistance. The Labour leadership will not wobble in its resolve to oppose the deal – doing so would pass up a golden opportunity to bring down the government and tear the Corbyn project apart. The Labour MPs who might back the deal are almost all from the centrist wing of the party, and fall into three categories: genuine Leavers, timid MPs representing Leave seats and those who profess concern about a no-deal scenario arising from a government defeat.

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Source:: from www.theguardian.com

Brussels

Government lacks clarity on jobs, economy and Northern Ireland border, says Labour leader

Jeremy Corbyn has accused the government of being “too weak and too divided” to properly protect the country during Brexit, as he used prime minister’s questions to lambast Theresa May over the issue before she heads to Brussels for a crunch summit.

The Labour leader cited warnings by businesses that a lack of clarity and the risk of border friction could hit investment and jobs, accused May of being obsessed by internal Conservative wrangles and urged her to keep the UK in the customs union.

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Source:: from www.theguardian.com

Crest Nicholson

Uncertainty over Brexit puts off buyers in the capital and south-east during autumn

The housebuilder Crest Nicholson has warned that profits will be lower than expected because of slowing sales in London and the south-east, where Brexit uncertainties are putting off buyers in the traditionally strong autumn selling season.

The company said it had not seen the pick-up in demand usual for early autumn, with prospective buyers unable to afford a home in the most expensive areas and and unwilling to make major spending decisions at a time of heightened political and economic uncertainty.

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Source:: from www.theguardian.com




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