At the heart of Brexit is democracy and what it means. Democracy is ‘a government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised by them directly or indirectly through a system of representation usually involving periodically held free elections’. When David Cameron called the EU referendum he vested supreme power in the people. We have yet to see this enacted. Initially those on the Remain side rushed to say they respected the result and I believe they did; however a minority of Remainers have not had the strength of their own democratic convictions to abide by that. The three years of delays have seduced them into seeing a way through to stopping the democratic process, using ‘No Deal’ as a ruse to stop Brexit.

We have this week had the startling news delivered via Angela Merkel that the EU would never ever allow Northern Ireland to leave the EU Customs Union. It’s a crying shame we weren’t told this on Day 1 and then we could have just spent the next six months preparing for ‘no deal’ and left in the autumn of 2017, sparing ourselves the two years of rancour.

For many of us who voted Leave, it was a decision about democratic control, who runs our country, transparency and accountability. We decided that the EU is none of the above. The negotiations have surely confirmed our view.

Let’s look at what has happened in the UK. Theresa May tried to keep us in the Customs Union that Mrs Merkel now tells us they won’t let us out of. This is directly against what was said in the referendum: we were told we would be able to do far reaching global trade deals which the Withdrawal Agreement prevented us doing by locking us in a Customs Union. For this reason Mrs May was destined to fail.

The ensuing leadership election for the Conservative Party was a democratic endeavour. Boris Johnson was elected by over half of the Conservative MPs and two thirds of the party members on a mandate of leaving the EU on the 31st October, do or die, deal or no deal. Yet within a very short space of time the 21 rebel MPs stripped of the whip (and Amber Rudd in her later actions) totally ignored the Conservative Party’s leadership election. Rory Stewart, as a leadership candidate, clearly set out his stall on TV and the various hustings for MPs. He did not win and in fact did not come close, with his votes falling back after a disastrous TV hustings.

The Conservative Party as a whole voted for Boris Johnson, his route out of the EU and vision for post-Brexit Britain. He stated he wanted a deal, but would be prepared to leave without a deal – believing that the second point made achieving the first far more likely. This is the path he has pursued. Yet as soon as they could the 21 rebels voted to take power away from their newly-elected Conservative Prime Minister and hand Commons business to the Opposition. This is not just voting against the whip but is actually a confidence issue, which is why the whip was rightly withdrawn from them. Sadly this demonstrated to me that these MPs refuse to acknowledge democracy. Their views were represented by Rory Stewart in the leadership campaign and he did not come close to winning. They have no mandate.

Sadly neither does the Speaker understand democracy. Speaker Bercow has clearly put his Remain views before his role of impartiality. He is there to adjudicate over the proceedings of the House. He has gone way beyond that remit and accepted amendments that block Brexit when they did not fit with the accepted criteria for amendments, he has abused the Standing Orders and worked with a cabal of MPs which has gone beyond offering objective opinion on procedure. He himself has admitted he will employ procedural creativity to stop a ‘no deal’ Brexit. In his latest wheeze he is now negotiating with the President of the European Parliament under an auspice only known to himself, but surely for his own aggrandisement. Speaker Bercow has brought his role into disrepute.

The Benn Act – what Boris Johnson rightly calls the Surrender Act – has been described as a parliamentary coup; but what it actually is, is a complete abuse of the power of the Office of the Speaker through use of the Standing Order 24 procedure, which is there to allow an emergency debate on a topic of the day, not an issue, Brexit, that has been ongoing for three years and Parliament has been mandated by the people to deliver.

At a fringe meeting that I attended at the recent Conservative Party Conference, Martin Howe QC said that there needs to be a Restoration of the Constitution Bill. I heartily agree. The Fixed-term Parliaments Act needs to be repealed. It was brought in as a political expedient, superseding a system that has brought us stable parliamentary democracy in the main since the Great Reform Act.

We have a Parliament that is holding hostage not only our Prime Minister but, most importantly, the people. Having reduced the Government’s majority to negative figures, Parliament will not allow him to ask the people. How dishonourable is that?

We therefore have a failure of democracy brought about by an amalgam of stakeholders refusing democracy and running a bureaucratic corporate management elite, dictating our future and only agreeing to let us out of their grip once we have acceded to their demands. This has been brought about by a group of MPs, the Speaker, the Lords and now the judiciary, with the Supreme Court perhaps going beyond its remit and leading us to now ask about the manner of their appointment.

The EU referendum was always about democracy and ultimately who has the final say in this country: the British people or EU eurocrats. We decided the British people, but our Parliament has not caught up with that yet. Our Parliament is acting exactly like the EU Commission. They masquerade as democrats, but they are in fact the elite dictating our future to us.

The EU’s mission is political integration. We have never voted for this and yet as members are dragged into this. It’s the same with our Rump Parliament: we did not vote to become a non-voting member of the EU, we voted to Leave properly and democracy will only be served when Boris Johnson is allowed to deliver that.

The biggest democratic vote in UK history may also serve to make us re-examine our archaic procedures and ensure they are fit for purpose for a bright democratic future outside the undemocratic management of the EU eurocrats.

Photocredit: ©UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor

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Although discord over Brexit is the most notorious dispute to emerge between the UK and the EU, it is not the first. The state’s default condition to be the supreme power over its affairs, internally and externally, has been transfigured by the inception of supranational organisations such as the EU. States are no longer able to form a protective shell and are forced to share their authority, with their borders becoming ever more porous.

While most other member states have acquiesced, accepting a reconstruction of their national sovereignty, there is one European state that bucks this trend: the UK. Such an alteration of what sovereignty means overhauls, as well as challenges, hundreds of years of established dogma concerning the UK’s conception of national sovereignty, thus culminating in the spurious relationship between the UK and the EU at present.

Within the British conception of national sovereignty there are four key areas that stimulate incompatibility with the EU: Parliamentary sovereignty, ingrained national beliefs, a uniquely British ‘international sovereignty’ and Britain’s two-faced behaviour towards the EU.

Parliamentary sovereignty

British national sovereignty is embedded in the fervently protected conception of Parliamentary sovereignty. As Britain lacks a palpable constitution, Parliamentary sovereignty forms the framework for how Britain conceives its national sovereignty, defined by Iris Nguyên-Duy in Sovereignty and Europe – The British Perspective as “the right to make or unmake any law whatever… that no person or body is recognised by the law as having a right to override or set aside the legislation of Parliament.”

The genetic make-up of sovereignty in the UK is based upon a principle of ‘political constitutionalism’ that ensures Parliament is the omnicompetent facet of government (See Marlene Wind here). Subsequently, sovereignty is unlimited, manifesting itself as a zero-sum game. Any encroachment on British sovereignty is seen as a threat subverting the UK’s power as a sovereign state, rendering sovereignty a game of relative gains, with gains for the EU resulting in insufferable losses for the UK. This dynamic implies there will always be a point at which the British conception of sovereignty is compromised by the EU.

The essence of parliamentary sovereignty is the way the UK perceives it as a dichotomous endeavour: sovereignty is either emboldened or eroded. At the heart of British statecraft is the defence of national autonomy symbolised in parliamentary sovereignty, representing the ability to “to govern… relatively insulated from both domestic and external pressures” (See ‘Sovereign nations and global markets: modern British Conservatism and hyperglobalism’ by Baker, D., Gamble, A. and Seawright, D. in The British Journal of Politics and International Relations).

To govern “insulated” is key, as insulation suggests that British sovereignty is absolute. If national sovereignty ceased to be located in Parliament, then it would cease to exist at all. This binary composition contrasts the EU’s conception of sovereignty which exists as a continuous conception; where state sovereignty is dialled up or down along a continuum to suit EU interests. Two parallel yet incompatible ways of looking at sovereignty, binary versus continuous, prompts fissures to emerge.

Incompatibility arises because the UK cannot initiate the pooling of sovereignty into the EU without contravening parliamentary sovereignty. British sovereignty is composed of in a manner that to pool into the EU facilitates an irreconcilable renunciation of core state tenets. Dynamics of binary versus continuous are not congruent. Parliamentary sovereignty must emphasise the “sovereign majority in Parliament as elevated above other balancing powers” (again, as per Marlene Wind) such as the EU, or lose the core levers of our nation state with it.

Ingrained national beliefs: British scepticism towards Europe

National beliefs underpin a significant part of our conception of sovereignty. Forming the atoms of the British nation state, its vital components, allegories, behaviours and symbols. British beliefs put an unshakable emphasis on the nation state as the final and absolute arbitrator of power. This means that in order to remain as a fully functioning and independent nation state, the UK cannot be impeded by an external actor. What is meant by ‘belief’ in this context is a set of emotional and amorphous beliefs that shape the British people and state; a set of values and principles that bind us together and guide our future. Subsequently, national beliefs are a key component in our conception of sovereignty and impact relationships beyond our borders.

Beliefs shape the set of criteria that defines the meaning of the nation state, they lay down the boundaries of sovereignty and help us interpret whether certain forces are violating our national sovereignty. ‘We’ is confined to one’s nation-state and where political sovereignty resides in the nation-state; membership of the EU erodes this imperative idea. EU institutions distort these boundaries, disrupting the membrane of national borders and lessens the ability of a democratically elected government to control its own affairs and ‘demos’ – the people. As the European integration project metamorphosed, it aimed to crack open the DNA of its member states to deepen political integration – something that the UK did not sign up to in 1973, nor has ever wanted as part of the EU. In short, the EU mutated into something the UK did not want nor forecast: a political integration project.

British attitudes towards Europe have always been somewhat far-removed, as Churchill described so succinctly, a benevolent onlooker who is “with Europe, but not of it. We are linked but not combined. We are interested and associated but not absorbed. We have our own dream and our own task.” These values form the exoskeleton for how Britain perceives itself and how it wants to be recognised internationally. Fundamentally, European integration from our shores is not founded upon a love for eternal cooperation in an organic sense. Our relationship with the EU is prosaic in nature; functional but not emotional. Our beliefs guide us towards a global destiny, not a regional one, with Churchill again providing the justification for this conclusion when he uttered “if Britain must choose between Europe and the open sea, she must always choose the open sea.” The crux of the matter is that the UK’s conception of sovereignty is constructed on a set of beliefs that advance the EU as an important, but not an indispensable, partner.

British ‘International Sovereignty’

The conception of British sovereignty has an international element, an ‘international sovereignty’ that possesses a soft, yet assertive, force. What ‘international sovereignty’ does for the UK is orient its default position away from the EU. It biases the British conception of sovereignty towards entities with which the UK has an organic relationship. ‘International sovereignty’ may seem incompatible with the EU’s conception of sovereignty, yet this is an incorrect conclusion to draw. Instead, this interaction is characterised by a lack of a relationship at all. It is neglect that fuels incompatibility. British ‘international sovereignty’ prefers to align itself away from the EU, consequently starving the EU of any interaction at all.

‘International sovereignty’ is only congruent with nations Britain sees common ground with. Europe and the Anglosphere are two different dimensions in which British ‘international sovereignty’ can project itself. While this relationship is disconnected in the EU dimension, once it moves into the Anglosphere British ‘international sovereignty’ finds its compass and direction. The two perceived aspects in which ‘international sovereignty’ can work biases sovereignty pooling in one direction only; towards the Anglosphere, fundamentally stimulating neglect and ensuring linkages wither between the UK and the EU.

The UK’s affinity for the Commonwealth and the United States adds to the level of ambivalence felt towards the EU. Britain’s Commonwealth connections retain an ever-present political pull that places the EU on the backburner. The Commonwealth, alongside the UK’s ‘special relationship’ with the United States, is an organic and natural orientation for our conception of sovereignty. Such a demeanour takes provenance from our deep historical ties between the people of the Anglosphere and the British Commonwealth. This idea feeds a collective mindset and reciprocity between the UK, the Commonwealth and the US.

The shared experiences of culture, language and politics bind the UK and its sister nations together into an intertwined society of like-minded states. It creates the impression that the UK has a benign influence guiding its allies in convergence with British interests – that somehow the Commonwealth, the US ‘special relationship’ and the English-speaking peoples of the world all belong to the UK in a way. Consequently, the UK perceives itself as the founding father of the Anglosphere; an English-speaking civilisation that regards itself as unquestionably unique from culturally similar Europe.

What ‘international sovereignty’ entails for the UK is that its version of national sovereignty has an international axis; transcending borders beyond Britain. It stimulates a perception that the UK can influence and act in lands foreign to itself because of shared cultural, linguistic and strategic ties. To live as part of the Anglosphere and beyond is the eminent British objective, bypassing the EU in the process.

The ‘two-faced’ behaviour of British national sovereignty

Europe has perennially appeared to invoke a choice and, therefore, it has been woven into the fabric of British thought that the EU is an option rather than a destiny. On the one hand, British sovereignty mellows when directed towards the Anglosphere, yet it takes on an awkward disposition when steered towards Europe. Essentially it splits British national sovereignty in two, depending on where the UK is aligned. A modus operandi such as this lies within a British quintessence that the UK can contribute something distinctive that is assumed to be missing in Europe. This ideal widens the schism between the UK and Europe.

Although Britain is part of the European orchestra, it does not play the same instrument. It reverberates at a different frequency and does not derive from the same path dependency. In practice, the British conception of sovereignty is ‘two-faced’. It is pre-programmed to being less receptive to the EU and more receptive to the Anglosphere. The de facto position of British sovereignty is to harden when reflected towards the EU and soften when oriented towards the Anglosphere. Overall, its DNA is dichotomous, exhibiting one of two behaviours depending on the pressing force; a ‘two-faced’ national sovereignty.

For instance, one can see the real-world outcome of this ‘two-faced’ sovereignty towards the EU in the long-term run-up to the Brexit vote. Years before Brexit, Britain pressed for the use of opt-outs on the Euro and the Schengen area amongst numerous others. Opt-outs draw a line in the sand. They establish an area where the state is to remain solely sovereign. Subtle, incremental processes of slowly hardening its conception of sovereignty towards the EU culminated in beleaguered negotiations to improve the existing deal with the EU in 2015-16. They failed, culminating in the Brexit vote which encapsulates the hardening of British sovereignty towards Europe and a natural inclination to reject further integration.

The ‘two-faced’ conception of British sovereignty only ever lays down two paths. Either Britain can cede its sovereign authority to supranational institutions, reducing the autonomy of its decision-making as European states can do little without the acquiescence and approval of their neighbours. Or, conversely, Britain can retain its legal and political rights within broader frameworks of inter-state cooperation; with an elected government able to decide Britain’s future trajectory without external interference. Britain does not want to rely on supranational institutions and continuously agree to policies that hinge on other states, as shown democratically by the Brexit vote of 2016.

Ultimately, this bi-polar facet of the British conception of sovereignty arises due to a perceived choice between a familiar intergovernmental model or an unfamiliar supranational model. EU institutions awaken parts of the British conception of sovereignty that were never designed nor adapted to be pooled into supranational organisations. British sovereignty hardens because it needs a safety mechanism built within it to protect the core tenets of the British state.

In conclusion, all of these factors amalgamate together to formulate a conception of sovereignty incompatible with integrative forces, hindering Britain from pooling sovereignty into the institutions of the EU. Therefore, and naturally, Britain is less likely to embrace integration advanced by supranational bodies. What we need to grasp is that globalisation can be forged in contrasting ways. There is a different route towards global integration. This time with the nation state at the helm, rather than delegating power to a body that cannot and will not solve the idiosyncratic and endemic problems of Britain.

Whilst our European partners forge a complex path through the many bureaucracies and rules of the EU, we can forge ours through our own Parliament and our own elected government. The referendum result does not indefinitely erect a wall between us and Europe. In fact, quite the contrary. Let us not get carried away and assume that everything will be immediately rosy when we leave; because that is simply not the case. There will be difficulties, as there often are in life. Nothing is guaranteed. Nevertheless, it is just as frivolous to assume that we will be worse off forever after leaving.

What the British conception of national sovereignty teaches us is that leaving is not an acrimonious principle. It is within our DNA to be “of Europe, but not a part of it” and that is OK. Although our European partners and those on the Remain side of the fence see it as a deleterious step, those who understand why we have come to this conclusion by scrutinising our conception of national sovereignty will deduce that leaving is an entirely natural phenomenon, that will, if common sense and logic were to prevail, open up multiple doors, laying down the foundations for a prosperous Britain after Brexit.

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The Brexit issue has certainly brought with it a series of apparently difficult constitutional issues, many of them concerning the respective roles of the executive and Parliament. Most of them arise because of the unwillingness of MPs, despite their professions to the contrary, to be bound by a constitutional rarity – a referendum – and as a consequence their determination to use Parliament to stand in the way of the executive’s commitment to give effect to the outcome of that referendum.

No one can be surprised, therefore, that the issue is increasingly seen by the general public as a battle between the popular will, as manifested in the referendum result, and their elected representatives in Parliament. That perception has been greatly helped by the Speaker, who seems determined to go out in a blaze of glory, and by his efforts to portray himself as the defender of Parliament’s rights and therefore of democracy.

The prorogation of Parliament has of course been the issue that has attracted most attention and is most easily characterised as an assault on constitutional convention, despite the fact that Parliament is, as a matter of course, always prorogued at this time of year. But of equal, if not greater, novelty and significance is another – and related – development.

If there has been one step above all others that has “stymied” the Government, it has been the passage of legislation that “instructs” the Prime Minister to seek an extension of the Brexit departure date from the EU. If there is any measure in the Brexit saga that breaks new constitutional ground, it is this Act of Parliament.

Parliament is of course able to pass any legislation it likes, but to use legislation to instruct a particular member of the executive to take a particular step is to see the legislature straying well and truly beyond its usual remit and into the realm of the executive. An Act of Parliament is a measure that almost always has a general application to at least a group, if not all, of the population as a whole, and its effect is usually to change the law for those affected.

To assume the role of an executive body and to prescribe a particular executive act is at the very least a departure from the norm. It represents the interjection of Parliament into the usual relationship between the executive and the electorate – one in which the elected government seeks to act on its undertakings to those who voted it into office.

Speaker Bercow may use his best and long-practised persona as the defender of democracy to try to persuade people that Parliament has behaved properly in this matter, but there is no concealing the relative novelty and far-reaching extent of what it has tried to do in this instance.

If we are to have a workable system of parliamentary government, it is of course essential that Parliament should be able hold the executive to account at every turn – but that is very different from claiming the right and power to dictate to the executive that it must take a particular step – and nor should the fact that the step required is of great significance be taken as providing a shred of justification for this power grab by Parliament.

For those who are quick to condemn the executive’s attempts to deliver on its promises and to complain about constitutional impropriety when it does so, a period of reflection on these issues may be in order.

Photocredit: ©UK Parliament / Jessica Taylor

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After just two hours’ debate, MPs have given a Second Reading by 329 to 300 (majority: 29) to Hilary Benn’s European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 6) Bill which would delay Brexit until January in the absence of a deal or approval for No Deal as of 19th October.

329 MPs voted for the Bill (331 if you include the two tellers) including 240 Labour MPs, all 35 Scottish National Party MPs, 30 Independent MPs, all 15 Liberal Democrat MPs, all 5 MPs from The Independent Group for Change, all 4 Plaid Cymru MPs, 1 Conservative MP and 1 Green Party MP.

300 voted against the Bill (302 if you include the two tellers) including 287 Conservative MPs, all 10 Democratic Unionist Party MPs, 3 Independent MPs and 2 Labour MPs.

A further 6 MPs did not vote in the division: 3 Labour MPs and 3 Independent MPs.

The one new Conservative rebel was Caroline Spelman, who had voted with the Government yesterday to oppose seizing the Commons agenda for today’s debate. 20 of the 21 Tory MPs who lost the party whip last night voted for the Bill; the other, Caroline Nokes, did not cast a vote.

Then after less than two hours’ debate at Committee Stage – and confusing scenes where backing was given for an amendment from Stephen Kinnock aimed at reviving a version of Theresa May’s deal without a vote – MPs gave the Bill a Third Reading by 327 to 299 (majority: 28).

327 MPs voted for the Bill (329 if you include the two tellers) including 239 Labour MPs, all 35 Scottish National Party MPs, 29 Independent MPs, all 15 Liberal Democrat MPs, all 5 MPs from The Independent Group for Change, all 4 Plaid Cymru MPs, 1 Conservative MP and 1 Green Party MP.

299 voted against the motion (301 if you include the two tellers) including 287 Conservative MPs, all 10 Democratic Unionist Party MPs, 3 Independent MPs and 1 Labour MP.

A further 9 MPs did not vote in the division: 5 Labour MPs and 4 Independent MPs.

Clearly the division lists were almost identical. Below is the list from Second Reading, with notes against those who voted differently at Third Reading. 

 

THE 331 MPs WHO SUPPORTED THE BILL AT SECOND READING
 
Conservative

  1. Caroline Spelman

Green Party

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. Guto Bebb
  3. Richard Benyon
  4. Luciana Berger
  5. Nick Boles
  6. Steve Brine
  7. Alistair Burt
  8. Greg Clark
  9. Kenneth Clarke
  10. Frank Field
  11. David Gauke
  12. Justine Greening
  13. Dominic Grieve
  14. Sam Gyimah
  15. Philip Hammond
  16. Stephen Hammond
  17. Richard Harrington
  18. Lady Hermon
  19. Kelvin Hopkins (Abstained at Third Reading)
  20. Margot James
  21. Oliver Letwin
  22. Stephen Lloyd
  23. Anne Milton
  24. Antoinette Sandbach
  25. Gavin Shuker
  26. Angela Smith
  27. Nicholas Soames
  28. Rory Stewart
  29. Edward Vaizey
  30. John Woodcock

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Adrian Bailey
  9. Margaret Beckett
  10. Hilary Benn
  11. Clive Betts
  12. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  13. Paul Blomfield
  14. Tracy Brabin
  15. Ben Bradshaw
  16. Kevin Brennan
  17. Lyn Brown
  18. Nicholas Brown
  19. Chris Bryant
  20. Karen Buck
  21. Richard Burden
  22. Richard Burgon
  23. Dawn Butler
  24. Liam Byrne
  25. Ruth Cadbury
  26. Alan Campbell
  27. Dan Carden
  28. Sarah Champion
  29. Jenny Chapman
  30. Bambos Charalambous
  31. Ann Clwyd (Abstained at Third Reading)
  32. Vernon Coaker
  33. Julie Cooper
  34. Rosie Cooper
  35. Yvette Cooper
  36. Jeremy Corbyn
  37. Neil Coyle
  38. David Crausby
  39. Mary Creagh
  40. Stella Creasy
  41. Jon Cruddas
  42. John Cryer
  43. Judith Cummins
  44. Alex Cunningham
  45. Jim Cunningham
  46. Janet Daby
  47. Nic Dakin
  48. Wayne David
  49. Geraint Davies
  50. Marsha De Cordova
  51. Gloria De Piero
  52. Thangam Debbonaire
  53. Emma Dent Coad
  54. Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi
  55. Anneliese Dodds
  56. Stephen Doughty
  57. Peter Dowd
  58. David Drew
  59. Jack Dromey
  60. Rosie Duffield
  61. Maria Eagle
  62. Angela Eagle
  63. Clive Efford
  64. Julie Elliott
  65. Louise Ellman
  66. Chris Elmore
  67. Bill Esterson
  68. Chris Evans
  69. Paul Farrelly
  70. Jim Fitzpatrick
  71. Colleen Fletcher
  72. Caroline Flint
  73. Lisa Forbes
  74. Yvonne Fovargue
  75. Vicky Foxcroft
  76. James Frith
  77. Gill Furniss
  78. Hugh Gaffney
  79. Barry Gardiner
  80. Ruth George
  81. Preet Kaur Gill
  82. Mary Glindon
  83. Roger Godsiff
  84. Helen Goodman
  85. Kate Green
  86. Lilian Greenwood
  87. Margaret Greenwood
  88. Nia Griffith
  89. John Grogan
  90. Andrew Gwynne
  91. Louise Haigh
  92. Fabian Hamilton
  93. David Hanson
  94. Emma Hardy
  95. Harriet Harman
  96. Carolyn Harris
  97. Helen Hayes
  98. Sue Hayman
  99. John Healey
  100. Mark Hendrick
  101. Stephen Hepburn (Abstained at Third Reading)
  102. Mike Hill
  103. Meg Hillier
  104. Margaret Hodge
  105. Sharon Hodgson
  106. Kate Hollern
  107. George Howarth
  108. Rupa Huq
  109. Imran Hussain
  110. Dan Jarvis
  111. Diana Johnson
  112. Darren Jones
  113. Gerald Jones
  114. Graham P Jones
  115. Helen Jones
  116. Kevan Jones
  117. Ruth Jones
  118. Sarah Jones
  119. Susan Elan Jones
  120. Mike Kane
  121. Barbara Keeley
  122. Liz Kendall
  123. Afzal Khan
  124. Ged Killen
  125. Stephen Kinnock
  126. Peter Kyle
  127. Lesley Laird
  128. David Lammy
  129. Ian Lavery
  130. Karen Lee
  131. Emma Lewell-Buck
  132. Clive Lewis
  133. Tony Lloyd
  134. Rebecca Long Bailey
  135. Ian C. Lucas
  136. Holly Lynch
  137. Justin Madders
  138. Khalid Mahmood
  139. Shabana Mahmood
  140. Seema Malhotra
  141. Gordon Marsden
  142. Sandy Martin
  143. Rachael Maskell
  144. Christian Matheson
  145. Steve McCabe
  146. Kerry McCarthy
  147. Siobhain McDonagh
  148. Andy McDonald
  149. John McDonnell
  150. Pat McFadden
  151. Conor McGinn
  152. Alison McGovern
  153. Liz McInnes
  154. Catherine McKinnell
  155. Jim McMahon
  156. Anna McMorrin
  157. Ian Mearns
  158. Edward Miliband
  159. Madeleine Moon
  160. Jessica Morden
  161. Stephen Morgan
  162. Grahame Morris
  163. Ian Murray
  164. Lisa Nandy
  165. Alex Norris
  166. Melanie Onn
  167. Chi Onwurah
  168. Kate Osamor
  169. Albert Owen
  170. Stephanie Peacock
  171. Teresa Pearce
  172. Matthew Pennycook
  173. Toby Perkins
  174. Jess Phillips
  175. Bridget Phillipson
  176. Laura Pidcock
  177. Jo Platt
  178. Luke Pollard
  179. Stephen Pound
  180. Lucy Powell
  181. Yasmin Qureshi
  182. Faisal Rashid
  183. Angela Rayner
  184. Steve Reed
  185. Christina Rees
  186. Ellie Reeves
  187. Rachel Reeves
  188. Emma Reynolds
  189. Jonathan Reynolds
  190. Marie Rimmer
  191. Geoffrey Robinson
  192. Matt Rodda
  193. Danielle Rowley
  194. Chris Ruane
  195. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
  196. Naz Shah
  197. Virendra Sharma
  198. Barry Sheerman
  199. Paula Sherriff
  200. Tulip Siddiq
  201. Dennis Skinner
  202. Andy Slaughter
  203. Ruth Smeeth
  204. Cat Smith
  205. Eleanor Smith
  206. Jeff Smith
  207. Laura Smith
  208. Nick Smith
  209. Owen Smith
  210. Karin Smyth
  211. Gareth Snell
  212. Alex Sobel
  213. John Spellar
  214. Keir Starmer
  215. Jo Stevens
  216. Wes Streeting
  217. Graham Stringer
  218. Paul Sweeney
  219. Mark Tami
  220. Gareth Thomas
  221. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  222. Emily Thornberry
  223. Stephen Timms
  224. Jon Trickett
  225. Anna Turley
  226. Karl Turner
  227. Stephen Twigg
  228. Liz Twist
  229. Keith Vaz
  230. Valerie Vaz
  231. Thelma Walker
  232. Tom Watson
  233. Catherine West
  234. Matt Western
  235. Alan Whitehead
  236. Martin Whitfield
  237. Paul Williams
  238. Phil Wilson
  239. Mohammad Yasin
  240. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Edward Davey
  5. Jane Dodds
  6. Tim Farron
  7. Wera Hobhouse
  8. Christine Jardine
  9. Norman Lamb
  10. Phillip Lee
  11. Layla Moran
  12. Jamie Stone
  13. Jo Swinson
  14. Chuka Umunna
  15. Sarah Wollaston

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

Scottish National Party

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Douglas Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Angus Brendan MacNeil
  25. Stewart Malcolm McDonald
  26. Stuart C. McDonald
  27. John McNally
  28. Carol Monaghan
  29. Gavin Newlands
  30. Brendan O’Hara
  31. Tommy Sheppard
  32. Chris Stephens
  33. Alison Thewliss
  34. Philippa Whitford
  35. Pete Wishart

The Independent Group for Change

  1. Ann Coffey
  2. Mike Gapes
  3. Chris Leslie
  4. Joan Ryan
  5. Anna Soubry

THE 6 MPs WHO DID NOT VOTE IN THE SECOND READING DIVISION*

Independent

  1. Caroline Nokes
  2. Jared O’Mara
  3. Chris Williamson

Labour

  1. Kevin Barron (Voted in favour at Third Reading)
  2. Ronnie Campbell
  3. Derek Twigg

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the seven Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats. NB: Absence from the division may be for a number of reasons, such as being ill, on parliamentary business elsewhere, as well as a deliberate abstention.

THE 302 MPs WHO OPPOSED THE BILL AT SECOND READING

Conservative

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Bim Afolami
  3. Adam Afriyie
  4. Peter Aldous
  5. Lucy Allan
  6. David Amess
  7. Stuart Andrew
  8. Edward Argar
  9. Victoria Atkins
  10. Richard Bacon
  11. Kemi Badenoch
  12. Steve Baker
  13. Harriett Baldwin
  14. Stephen Barclay
  15. John Baron
  16. Henry Bellingham
  17. Paul Beresford
  18. Jake Berry
  19. Bob Blackman
  20. Crispin Blunt
  21. Peter Bone
  22. Peter Bottomley
  23. Andrew Bowie
  24. Ben Bradley
  25. Karen Bradley
  26. Graham Brady
  27. Suella Braverman
  28. Jack Brereton
  29. Andrew Bridgen
  30. James Brokenshire
  31. Fiona Bruce
  32. Robert Buckland
  33. Alex Burghart
  34. Conor Burns
  35. Alun Cairns
  36. James Cartlidge
  37. William Cash
  38. Maria Caulfield
  39. Alex Chalk
  40. Rehman Chishti
  41. Christopher Chope
  42. Jo Churchill
  43. Colin Clark
  44. Simon Clarke
  45. James Cleverly
  46. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  47. Th?r?se Coffey
  48. Damian Collins
  49. Alberto Costa
  50. Robert Courts
  51. Geoffrey Cox
  52. Stephen Crabb
  53. Tracey Crouch
  54. David T. C. Davies
  55. Glyn Davies
  56. Mims Davies
  57. Philip Davies
  58. David Davis
  59. Caroline Dinenage
  60. Jonathan Djanogly
  61. Leo Docherty
  62. Michelle Donelan
  63. Nadine Dorries
  64. Steve Double
  65. Oliver Dowden
  66. Jackie Doyle-Price
  67. Richard Drax
  68. James Duddridge
  69. David Duguid
  70. Iain Duncan Smith
  71. Alan Duncan
  72. Philip Dunne
  73. Michael Ellis
  74. Tobias Ellwood
  75. George Eustice
  76. Nigel Evans
  77. David Evennett
  78. Michael Fabricant
  79. Michael Fallon
  80. Mark Field
  81. Vicky Ford
  82. Kevin Foster
  83. Liam Fox
  84. Mark Francois
  85. Lucy Frazer
  86. George Freeman
  87. Mike Freer
  88. Marcus Fysh
  89. Roger Gale
  90. Mark Garnier
  91. Nusrat Ghani
  92. Nick Gibb
  93. Cheryl Gillan
  94. John Glen
  95. Zac Goldsmith
  96. Robert Goodwill
  97. Michael Gove
  98. Luke Graham
  99. Richard Graham
  100. Bill Grant
  101. Helen Grant
  102. James Gray
  103. Chris Grayling
  104. Chris Green
  105. Damian Green
  106. Andrew Griffiths
  107. Kirstene Hair
  108. Robert Halfon
  109. Luke Hall
  110. Matt Hancock
  111. Greg Hands
  112. Mark Harper
  113. Rebecca Harris
  114. Trudy Harrison
  115. Simon Hart
  116. John Hayes
  117. Oliver Heald
  118. James Heappey
  119. Chris Heaton-Harris
  120. Peter Heaton-Jones
  121. Gordon Henderson
  122. Nick Herbert
  123. Damian Hinds
  124. Simon Hoare
  125. George Hollingbery
  126. Kevin Hollinrake
  127. Philip Hollobone
  128. Adam Holloway
  129. John Howell
  130. Nigel Huddleston
  131. Eddie Hughes
  132. Jeremy Hunt
  133. Nick Hurd
  134. Alister Jack
  135. Sajid Javid
  136. Ranil Jayawardena
  137. Bernard Jenkin
  138. Andrea Jenkyns
  139. Robert Jenrick
  140. Boris Johnson
  141. Caroline Johnson
  142. Gareth Johnson
  143. Joseph Johnson
  144. Andrew Jones
  145. David Jones
  146. Marcus Jones
  147. Daniel Kawczynski
  148. Gillian Keegan
  149. Seema Kennedy
  150. Stephen Kerr
  151. Julian Knight
  152. Greg Knight
  153. Kwasi Kwarteng
  154. John Lamont
  155. Mark Lancaster
  156. Pauline Latham
  157. Andrea Leadsom
  158. Jeremy Lefroy
  159. Edward Leigh
  160. Andrew Lewer
  161. Brandon Lewis
  162. Julian Lewis
  163. Ian Liddell-Grainger
  164. David Lidington
  165. Julia Lopez
  166. Jack Lopresti
  167. Jonathan Lord
  168. Tim Loughton
  169. Craig Mackinlay
  170. Rachel Maclean
  171. Anne Main
  172. Alan Mak
  173. Kit Malthouse
  174. Scott Mann
  175. Paul Masterton
  176. Theresa May
  177. Paul Maynard
  178. Patrick McLoughlin
  179. Stephen McPartland
  180. Esther McVey
  181. Mark Menzies
  182. Johnny Mercer
  183. Huw Merriman
  184. Stephen Metcalfe
  185. Maria Miller
  186. Amanda Milling
  187. Nigel Mills
  188. Andrew Mitchell
  189. Damien Moore
  190. Penny Mordaunt
  191. Nicky Morgan
  192. Anne Marie Morris
  193. David Morris
  194. James Morris
  195. Wendy Morton
  196. David Mundell
  197. Sheryll Murray
  198. Andrew Murrison
  199. Robert Neill
  200. Sarah Newton
  201. Jesse Norman
  202. Neil O’Brien
  203. Matthew Offord
  204. Guy Opperman
  205. Neil Parish
  206. Priti Patel
  207. Owen Paterson
  208. Mark Pawsey
  209. Mike Penning
  210. John Penrose
  211. Andrew Percy
  212. Claire Perry
  213. Chris Philp
  214. Christopher Pincher
  215. Dan Poulter
  216. Rebecca Pow
  217. Victoria Prentis
  218. Mark Prisk
  219. Mark Pritchard
  220. Tom Pursglove
  221. Jeremy Quin
  222. Will Quince
  223. Dominic Raab
  224. John Redwood
  225. Jacob Rees-Mogg
  226. Laurence Robertson
  227. Mary Robinson
  228. Andrew Rosindell
  229. Douglas Ross
  230. Lee Rowley
  231. Amber Rudd
  232. David Rutley
  233. Paul Scully
  234. Bob Seely
  235. Andrew Selous
  236. Grant Shapps
  237. Alok Sharma
  238. Alec Shelbrooke
  239. Keith Simpson
  240. Chris Skidmore
  241. Chloe Smith
  242. Henry Smith
  243. Julian Smith
  244. Royston Smith
  245. Mark Spencer
  246. Andrew Stephenson
  247. John Stevenson
  248. Bob Stewart
  249. Iain Stewart
  250. Gary Streeter
  251. Mel Stride
  252. Graham Stuart
  253. Julian Sturdy
  254. Rishi Sunak
  255. Desmond Swayne
  256. Hugo Swire
  257. Robert Syms
  258. Derek Thomas
  259. Ross Thomson
  260. Maggie Throup
  261. Kelly Tolhurst
  262. Justin Tomlinson
  263. Michael Tomlinson
  264. Craig Tracey
  265. David Tredinnick
  266. Anne-Marie Trevelyan
  267. Elizabeth Truss
  268. Tom Tugendhat
  269. Shailesh Vara
  270. Martin Vickers
  271. Theresa Villiers
  272. Charles Walker
  273. Robin Walker
  274. Ben Wallace
  275. David Warburton
  276. Matt Warman
  277. Giles Watling
  278. Helen Whately
  279. Heather Wheeler
  280. Craig Whittaker
  281. John Whittingdale
  282. Bill Wiggin
  283. Gavin Williamson
  284. Mike Wood
  285. William Wragg
  286. Jeremy Wright
  287. Nadhim Zahawi

Democratic Unionist Party

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Jeffrey M. Donaldson
  4. Paul Girvan
  5. Emma Little Pengelly
  6. Ian Paisley
  7. Gavin Robinson
  8. Jim Shannon
  9. David Simpson
  10. Sammy Wilson

Independent

  1. Ian Austin
  2. Charlie Elphicke
  3. Ivan Lewis

Labour

  1. Kate Hoey
  2. John Mann (Abstained at Third Reading)

Photocredit: ©UK Parliament / Jessica Taylor

The post MPs back Hilary Benn’s Bill to delay Brexit – How every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

MPs have voted by 328 votes to 301 (majority: 27) for a motion tabled by Oliver Letwin that seizes control of the Commons Order Paper on Wednesday 4th September to allow time to push through in four hours Hilary Benn’s Bill which would effectively delay Brexit further. The Bill states that unless a deal is reached with the EU or Parliament approves a no-deal Brexit by October 19th, the Government would be required to write to the EU seeking an extension to the Article 50 period until January 31st 2020. Under the terms of the motion, the debate on the Bill will begin at 3pm on Wednesday. 

328 MPs voted for the motion (330 if you include the two tellers) including 241 Labour MPs, all 35 Scottish National Party MPs, 21 Conservative MPs, all 15 Liberal Democrat MPs, 8 Independent MPs, all 5 MPs from The Independent Group for Change, all 4 Plaid Cymru MPs, and 1 Green Party MP.

301 Voted against the motion (303 if you include the two tellers) including 288 Conservative MPs, all 10 Democratic Unionist Party MPs, 3 Independent MPs, and 2 Labour MPs.

A further 6 (4 Independents and 2 Labour) did not vote in the division.

THE 330 MPs WHO SUPPORTED THE MOTION
 
Conservative

  1. Guto Bebb
  2. Richard Benyon
  3. Steve Brine
  4. Alistair Burt
  5. Greg Clark
  6. Kenneth Clarke
  7. David Gauke
  8. Justine Greening
  9. Dominic Grieve
  10. Sam Gyimah
  11. Philip Hammond
  12. Stephen Hammond
  13. Richard Harrington
  14. Margot James
  15. Oliver Letwin
  16. Anne Milton
  17. Caroline Nokes
  18. Antoinette Sandbach
  19. Nicholas Soames
  20. Rory Stewart
  21. Edward Vaizey

Green Party

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. Luciana Berger
  3. Nick Boles
  4. Frank Field
  5. Lady Hermon
  6. Stephen Lloyd
  7. Gavin Shuker
  8. Angela Smith

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Adrian Bailey
  9. Margaret Beckett
  10. Hilary Benn
  11. Clive Betts
  12. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  13. Paul Blomfield
  14. Tracy Brabin
  15. Ben Bradshaw
  16. Kevin Brennan
  17. Lyn Brown
  18. Nicholas Brown
  19. Chris Bryant
  20. Karen Buck
  21. Richard Burden
  22. Richard Burgon
  23. Dawn Butler
  24. Liam Byrne
  25. Ruth Cadbury
  26. Ronnie Campbell
  27. Alan Campbell
  28. Dan Carden
  29. Sarah Champion
  30. Jenny Chapman
  31. Bambos Charalambous
  32. Ann Clwyd
  33. Vernon Coaker
  34. Julie Cooper
  35. Rosie Cooper
  36. Yvette Cooper
  37. Jeremy Corbyn
  38. Neil Coyle
  39. David Crausby
  40. Mary Creagh
  41. Stella Creasy
  42. Jon Cruddas
  43. John Cryer
  44. Judith Cummins
  45. Alex Cunningham
  46. Jim Cunningham
  47. Janet Daby
  48. Nic Dakin
  49. Wayne David
  50. Geraint Davies
  51. Marsha De Cordova
  52. Gloria De Piero
  53. Thangam Debbonaire
  54. Emma Dent Coad
  55. Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi
  56. Anneliese Dodds
  57. Stephen Doughty
  58. Peter Dowd
  59. David Drew
  60. Jack Dromey
  61. Rosie Duffield
  62. Maria Eagle
  63. Angela Eagle
  64. Clive Efford
  65. Julie Elliott
  66. Louise Ellman
  67. Chris Elmore
  68. Bill Esterson
  69. Chris Evans
  70. Paul Farrelly
  71. Jim Fitzpatrick
  72. Colleen Fletcher
  73. Caroline Flint
  74. Lisa Forbes
  75. Yvonne Fovargue
  76. Vicky Foxcroft
  77. James Frith
  78. Gill Furniss
  79. Hugh Gaffney
  80. Barry Gardiner
  81. Ruth George
  82. Preet Kaur Gill
  83. Mary Glindon
  84. Roger Godsiff
  85. Helen Goodman
  86. Kate Green
  87. Lilian Greenwood
  88. Margaret Greenwood
  89. Nia Griffith
  90. John Grogan
  91. Andrew Gwynne
  92. Louise Haigh
  93. Fabian Hamilton
  94. David Hanson
  95. Emma Hardy
  96. Harriet Harman
  97. Carolyn Harris
  98. Helen Hayes
  99. Sue Hayman
  100. John Healey
  101. Mark Hendrick
  102. Stephen Hepburn
  103. Mike Hill
  104. Meg Hillier
  105. Margaret Hodge
  106. Sharon Hodgson
  107. Kate Hollern
  108. George Howarth
  109. Rupa Huq
  110. Imran Hussain
  111. Dan Jarvis
  112. Diana Johnson
  113. Darren Jones
  114. Gerald Jones
  115. Graham P Jones
  116. Helen Jones
  117. Kevan Jones
  118. Ruth Jones
  119. Sarah Jones
  120. Susan Elan Jones
  121. Mike Kane
  122. Barbara Keeley
  123. Liz Kendall
  124. Afzal Khan
  125. Ged Killen
  126. Stephen Kinnock
  127. Peter Kyle
  128. Lesley Laird
  129. David Lammy
  130. Ian Lavery
  131. Karen Lee
  132. Emma Lewell-Buck
  133. Clive Lewis
  134. Tony Lloyd
  135. Rebecca Long Bailey
  136. Ian C. Lucas
  137. Holly Lynch
  138. Justin Madders
  139. Khalid Mahmood
  140. Shabana Mahmood
  141. Seema Malhotra
  142. Gordon Marsden
  143. Sandy Martin
  144. Rachael Maskell
  145. Christian Matheson
  146. Steve McCabe
  147. Kerry McCarthy
  148. Siobhain McDonagh
  149. Andy McDonald
  150. John McDonnell
  151. Pat McFadden
  152. Conor McGinn
  153. Alison McGovern
  154. Liz McInnes
  155. Catherine McKinnell
  156. Jim McMahon
  157. Anna McMorrin
  158. Ian Mearns
  159. Edward Miliband
  160. Madeleine Moon
  161. Jessica Morden
  162. Stephen Morgan
  163. Grahame Morris
  164. Ian Murray
  165. Lisa Nandy
  166. Alex Norris
  167. Melanie Onn
  168. Chi Onwurah
  169. Kate Osamor
  170. Albert Owen
  171. Stephanie Peacock
  172. Teresa Pearce
  173. Matthew Pennycook
  174. Toby Perkins
  175. Jess Phillips
  176. Bridget Phillipson
  177. Laura Pidcock
  178. Jo Platt
  179. Luke Pollard
  180. Stephen Pound
  181. Lucy Powell
  182. Yasmin Qureshi
  183. Faisal Rashid
  184. Angela Rayner
  185. Steve Reed
  186. Christina Rees
  187. Ellie Reeves
  188. Rachel Reeves
  189. Emma Reynolds
  190. Jonathan Reynolds
  191. Marie Rimmer
  192. Geoffrey Robinson
  193. Matt Rodda
  194. Danielle Rowley
  195. Chris Ruane
  196. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
  197. Naz Shah
  198. Virendra Sharma
  199. Barry Sheerman
  200. Paula Sherriff
  201. Tulip Siddiq
  202. Dennis Skinner
  203. Andy Slaughter
  204. Ruth Smeeth
  205. Cat Smith
  206. Eleanor Smith
  207. Jeff Smith
  208. Laura Smith
  209. Nick Smith
  210. Owen Smith
  211. Karin Smyth
  212. Gareth Snell
  213. Alex Sobel
  214. John Spellar
  215. Keir Starmer
  216. Jo Stevens
  217. Wes Streeting
  218. Graham Stringer
  219. Paul Sweeney
  220. Mark Tami
  221. Gareth Thomas
  222. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  223. Emily Thornberry
  224. Stephen Timms
  225. Jon Trickett
  226. Anna Turley
  227. Karl Turner
  228. Stephen Twigg
  229. Liz Twist
  230. Keith Vaz
  231. Valerie Vaz
  232. Thelma Walker
  233. Tom Watson
  234. Catherine West
  235. Matt Western
  236. Alan Whitehead
  237. Martin Whitfield
  238. Paul Williams
  239. Phil Wilson
  240. Mohammad Yasin
  241. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Edward Davey
  5. Jane Dodds
  6. Tim Farron
  7. Wera Hobhouse
  8. Christine Jardine
  9. Norman Lamb
  10. Phillip Lee
  11. Layla Moran
  12. Jamie Stone
  13. Jo Swinson
  14. Chuka Umunna
  15. Sarah Wollaston

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

Scottish National Party

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Douglas Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Angus Brendan MacNeil
  25. Stewart Malcolm McDonald
  26. Stuart C. McDonald
  27. John McNally
  28. Carol Monaghan
  29. Gavin Newlands
  30. Brendan O’Hara
  31. Tommy Sheppard
  32. Chris Stephens
  33. Alison Thewliss
  34. Philippa Whitford
  35. Pete Wishart

The Independent Group for Change

  1. Ann Coffey
  2. Mike Gapes
  3. Chris Leslie
  4. Joan Ryan
  5. Anna Soubry

THE 6 MPs WHO DID NOT VOTE IN THE DIVISION*

Independent

  1. Kelvin Hopkins
  2. Jared O’Mara
  3. Chris Williamson
  4. John Woodcock

Labour

  1. Kevin Barron
  2. Derek Twigg

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the seven Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats. NB: Absence from the division may be for a number of reasons, such as being ill, on parliamentary business elsewhere, as well as a deliberate abstention.

THE 303 MPs WHO OPPOSED THE MOTION

Conservative

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Bim Afolami
  3. Adam Afriyie
  4. Peter Aldous
  5. Lucy Allan
  6. David Amess
  7. Stuart Andrew
  8. Edward Argar
  9. Victoria Atkins
  10. Richard Bacon
  11. Kemi Badenoch
  12. Steve Baker
  13. Harriett Baldwin
  14. Stephen Barclay
  15. John Baron
  16. Henry Bellingham
  17. Paul Beresford
  18. Jake Berry
  19. Bob Blackman
  20. Crispin Blunt
  21. Peter Bone
  22. Peter Bottomley
  23. Andrew Bowie
  24. Ben Bradley
  25. Karen Bradley
  26. Graham Brady
  27. Suella Braverman
  28. Jack Brereton
  29. Andrew Bridgen
  30. James Brokenshire
  31. Fiona Bruce
  32. Robert Buckland
  33. Alex Burghart
  34. Conor Burns
  35. Alun Cairns
  36. James Cartlidge
  37. William Cash
  38. Maria Caulfield
  39. Alex Chalk
  40. Rehman Chishti
  41. Christopher Chope
  42. Jo Churchill
  43. Colin Clark
  44. Simon Clarke
  45. James Cleverly
  46. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  47. Th?r?se Coffey
  48. Damian Collins
  49. Alberto Costa
  50. Robert Courts
  51. Geoffrey Cox
  52. Stephen Crabb
  53. Tracey Crouch
  54. David T. C. Davies
  55. Glyn Davies
  56. Mims Davies
  57. Philip Davies
  58. David Davis
  59. Caroline Dinenage
  60. Jonathan Djanogly
  61. Leo Docherty
  62. Michelle Donelan
  63. Nadine Dorries
  64. Steve Double
  65. Oliver Dowden
  66. Jackie Doyle-Price
  67. Richard Drax
  68. James Duddridge
  69. David Duguid
  70. Iain Duncan Smith
  71. Alan Duncan
  72. Philip Dunne
  73. Michael Ellis
  74. Tobias Ellwood
  75. George Eustice
  76. Nigel Evans
  77. David Evennett
  78. Michael Fabricant
  79. Michael Fallon
  80. Mark Field
  81. Vicky Ford
  82. Kevin Foster
  83. Liam Fox
  84. Mark Francois
  85. Lucy Frazer
  86. George Freeman
  87. Mike Freer
  88. Marcus Fysh
  89. Roger Gale
  90. Mark Garnier
  91. Nusrat Ghani
  92. Nick Gibb
  93. Cheryl Gillan
  94. John Glen
  95. Zac Goldsmith
  96. Robert Goodwill
  97. Michael Gove
  98. Luke Graham
  99. Richard Graham
  100. Bill Grant
  101. Helen Grant
  102. James Gray
  103. Chris Grayling
  104. Chris Green
  105. Damian Green
  106. Andrew Griffiths
  107. Kirstene Hair
  108. Robert Halfon
  109. Luke Hall
  110. Matt Hancock
  111. Greg Hands
  112. Mark Harper
  113. Rebecca Harris
  114. Trudy Harrison
  115. Simon Hart
  116. John Hayes
  117. Oliver Heald
  118. James Heappey
  119. Chris Heaton-Harris
  120. Peter Heaton-Jones
  121. Gordon Henderson
  122. Nick Herbert
  123. Damian Hinds
  124. Simon Hoare
  125. George Hollingbery
  126. Kevin Hollinrake
  127. Philip Hollobone
  128. Adam Holloway
  129. John Howell
  130. Nigel Huddleston
  131. Eddie Hughes
  132. Jeremy Hunt
  133. Nick Hurd
  134. Alister Jack
  135. Sajid Javid
  136. Ranil Jayawardena
  137. Bernard Jenkin
  138. Andrea Jenkyns
  139. Robert Jenrick
  140. Boris Johnson
  141. Caroline Johnson
  142. Gareth Johnson
  143. Joseph Johnson
  144. Andrew Jones
  145. David Jones
  146. Marcus Jones
  147. Daniel Kawczynski
  148. Gillian Keegan
  149. Seema Kennedy
  150. Stephen Kerr
  151. Julian Knight
  152. Greg Knight
  153. Kwasi Kwarteng
  154. John Lamont
  155. Mark Lancaster
  156. Pauline Latham
  157. Andrea Leadsom
  158. Jeremy Lefroy
  159. Edward Leigh
  160. Andrew Lewer
  161. Brandon Lewis
  162. Julian Lewis
  163. Ian Liddell-Grainger
  164. David Lidington
  165. Julia Lopez
  166. Jack Lopresti
  167. Jonathan Lord
  168. Tim Loughton
  169. Craig Mackinlay
  170. Rachel Maclean
  171. Anne Main
  172. Alan Mak
  173. Kit Malthouse
  174. Scott Mann
  175. Paul Masterton
  176. Theresa May
  177. Paul Maynard
  178. Patrick McLoughlin
  179. Stephen McPartland
  180. Esther McVey
  181. Mark Menzies
  182. Johnny Mercer
  183. Huw Merriman
  184. Stephen Metcalfe
  185. Maria Miller
  186. Amanda Milling
  187. Nigel Mills
  188. Andrew Mitchell
  189. Damien Moore
  190. Penny Mordaunt
  191. Nicky Morgan
  192. Anne Marie Morris
  193. David Morris
  194. James Morris
  195. Wendy Morton
  196. David Mundell
  197. Sheryll Murray
  198. Andrew Murrison
  199. Robert Neill
  200. Sarah Newton
  201. Jesse Norman
  202. Neil O’Brien
  203. Matthew Offord
  204. Guy Opperman
  205. Neil Parish
  206. Priti Patel
  207. Owen Paterson
  208. Mark Pawsey
  209. Mike Penning
  210. John Penrose
  211. Andrew Percy
  212. Claire Perry
  213. Chris Philp
  214. Christopher Pincher
  215. Dan Poulter
  216. Rebecca Pow
  217. Victoria Prentis
  218. Mark Prisk
  219. Mark Pritchard
  220. Tom Pursglove
  221. Jeremy Quin
  222. Will Quince
  223. Dominic Raab
  224. John Redwood
  225. Jacob Rees-Mogg
  226. Laurence Robertson
  227. Mary Robinson
  228. Andrew Rosindell
  229. Douglas Ross
  230. Lee Rowley
  231. Amber Rudd
  232. David Rutley
  233. Paul Scully
  234. Bob Seely
  235. Andrew Selous
  236. Grant Shapps
  237. Alok Sharma
  238. Alec Shelbrooke
  239. Keith Simpson
  240. Chris Skidmore
  241. Chloe Smith
  242. Henry Smith
  243. Julian Smith
  244. Royston Smith
  245. Caroline Spelman
  246. Mark Spencer
  247. Andrew Stephenson
  248. John Stevenson
  249. Bob Stewart
  250. Iain Stewart
  251. Gary Streeter
  252. Mel Stride
  253. Graham Stuart
  254. Julian Sturdy
  255. Rishi Sunak
  256. Desmond Swayne
  257. Hugo Swire
  258. Robert Syms
  259. Derek Thomas
  260. Ross Thomson
  261. Maggie Throup
  262. Kelly Tolhurst
  263. Justin Tomlinson
  264. Michael Tomlinson
  265. Craig Tracey
  266. David Tredinnick
  267. Anne-Marie Trevelyan
  268. Elizabeth Truss
  269. Tom Tugendhat
  270. Shailesh Vara
  271. Martin Vickers
  272. Theresa Villiers
  273. Charles Walker
  274. Robin Walker
  275. Ben Wallace
  276. David Warburton
  277. Matt Warman
  278. Giles Watling
  279. Helen Whately
  280. Heather Wheeler
  281. Craig Whittaker
  282. John Whittingdale
  283. Bill Wiggin
  284. Gavin Williamson
  285. Mike Wood
  286. William Wragg
  287. Jeremy Wright
  288. Nadhim Zahawi

Democratic Unionist Party

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Jeffrey M. Donaldson
  4. Paul Girvan
  5. Emma Little Pengelly
  6. Ian Paisley
  7. Gavin Robinson
  8. Jim Shannon
  9. David Simpson
  10. Sammy Wilson

Independent

  1. Ian Austin
  2. Charlie Elphicke
  3. Ivan Lewis

Labour

  1. Kate Hoey
  2. John Mann

The post 21 Tories rebel as MPs vote to seize Wednesday’s Commons agenda for Bill to delay Brexit – How every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

Today the House of Commons returns from its nearly six-week summer recess (where were the petitions, protests and howls of outrage about that?) and we can expect parliamentary fireworks later today as Remainer MPs embark on their latest attempt to prevent a no-deal Brexit.

Yesterday afternoon Hilary Benn published the text of his European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 6) Bill, launched with the support of a cross-party group including former Cabinet ministers Philip Hammond and David Gauke. We expect Speaker Bercow to grant an emergency ‘Standing Order No. 24’ debate today and allow a vote on an amendment to a bland motion that, if passed, would allow MPs to seize control of the Commons Order Paper to provide time to try and ram the Bill through the Commons in a day later this week.

(A note on timing: these shenanigans won’t begin in the House of Commons until considerably later this afternoon – and it could even be early evening. The parliamentary day opens at 2.30pm with Dominic Raab making his Despatch Box debut as Foreign Secretary with an hour of Foreign Office questions. After that at 3.30pm – before we get into the emergency Standing Order No. 24 debate – there will be a statement from Boris Johnson on Brexit and the G7 summit, which will surely go on for a couple of hours, after which we then expect Michael Gove to make a statement on no-deal preparations.)

Benn’s Bill states that unless a deal is reached with the EU or Parliament approves a no-deal Brexit by October 19th, the Government would be required to write to the EU seeking an extension to the Article 50 period until January 31st 2020 – a further Brexit delay that would take us to a few months shy of four years since the referendum.

The Bill codifies the exact wording of the letter that the Prime Minister would need to send to the EU with the proviso that if the European Council agrees to an extension to 31st January 2020, the Prime Minister would immediately have to accept that extension. Extraordinarily, it goes on to state that if the European Council agreed an extension to any other unspecified date, at any point in the dim and distant future, the Prime Minister would have to accept it within two days (unless the House of Commons rejected it, and it’s unclear what would happen then).

As Zac Goldsmith – now a minister in the Johnson Government – tweeted last night: “This isn’t about creating a thoughtful delay; it is about stopping Brexit”. And lest we forget, most of those claiming to be against No Deal also opposed Theresa May’s horrific deal – because they don’t want a deal at all, because they don’t want Brexit.

There are several commentaries on the proposal I’ve seen that are worth a look: Open Europe’s Dominic Walsh notes here that the Bill would not actually take No Deal off the table (as some also erroneously claimed the Cooper-Letwin Bill did earlier in the year), but merely kick the can down the road a little further.

And Robert Craig, a lecturer in Public Law at the LSE, highlights here a potentially important but somewhat complicated issue relating to the exercise of prerogative power in respect of the procedure known as Queen’s Consent (totally separate from Royal Assent), which might provide an avenue for the Government to stop it in its tracks.

However, not long after details of the Bill began to emerge late yesterday afternoon, Boris Johnson emerged from Downing Street after a Cabinet meeting to deliver a message directly to the nation about his efforts to strike a new, better deal with the EU:

“If there is one thing that can hold us back in these talks it is the sense in Brussels that MPs may find some way to cancel the referendum – or that tomorrow MPs will vote, with Jeremy Corbyn, for yet another pointless delay… If they do, they will plainly chop the legs out from under the UK position and make any further negotiation absolutely impossible. And so I say, to show our friends in Brussels that we are united in our purpose, MPs should vote with the Government against Corbyn’s pointless delay. I want everybody to know – there are no circumstances in which I will ask Brussels to delay.

“We are leaving on 31st October, no ifs or buts. We will not accept any attempt to go back on our promises or scrub that referendum. Armed and fortified with that conviction I believe we will get a deal at that crucial summit in October: a deal that Parliament will certainly be able to scrutinise – and in the meantime let our negotiators get on with their work without that sword of Damocles over their necks. And without an election, which I don’t want and you don’t want.”

You can read the full text of his statement here or watch it on our YouTube channel here.

Yet for all Johnson’s insistence that he doesn’t want to go the polls, speculation about an imminent election reached fever pitch yesterday. And last night, a senior Government source said that if MPs do back today’s cross-party move to seize control of Commons business, he would seek a general election on October 14th – a move which would require the support of two-thirds of MPs under the provisions of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act (FTPA).

The Government source said MPs would face a “simple choice” today and that the vote would be treated as though it were a vote of no confidence, with any Conservative MP voting against the Government having the party whip removed from them. The source continued:

“If they vote tomorrow to wreck the negotiation process, to go against giving Britain the ability to negotiate a deal, then they’ll also have to reflect on what comes next… If MPs were to vote tomorrow to take control of the Order Paper, so destroying the Government’s negotiating position, to make it impossible for the UK to negotiate a deal with Brussels, then the vote would then move to an FTPA vote, which I would expect to bring about a general election.”

“I think if you were to have any chance of securing a deal, which the PM has been very clear that he wants… you would want to have that election on October 14th so that you can go to European Council [on October 17th] and secure a deal.”

Yet last night there was increasing confusion over whether Opposition MPs would actually vote for a motion to call a general election if one were put to the House of Commons. Having been bleating for yonks about wanting to “go back to the people” and after all that outrage about there being an “unelected Prime Minister” and a “coup”, senior Labour figures seriously appeared to be suggesting that they would not want an immediate general election after all. Extraordinary times.

Moreover, if an election takes place before Brexit has taken place, with Johnson’s Conservatives standing on a platform of still pursuing a deal with the EU, there is the not inconsiderable headache of the Brexit Party challenging them in every seat across the country, as a spokesman reminded us yesterday:

“Nigel Farage has made clear that the Brexit Party would put country before party if Boris Johnson commits to an unambiguous, no-deal Brexit. We can make Boris a hero in that situation. A non-aggression pact Leave Alliance would deliver a very significant majority for this position. If Johnson brings back a re-hashed version of May’s Non-Withdrawal Treaty, just without the dreaded backstop, it’s not Brexit and we will oppose his candidates in every seat, denying the Tories hope of victory. Partnership is the best way to deliver what 17.4 million voted for.”

We really are in high stakes territory. And if anyone claims they can predict exactly what’s going to happen next, I would caution against believing them.

– – –

The above is an edited version of Jonathan Isaby’s BrexitCentral Daily Briefing, an email which is sent out every morning. To subscribe for free, click here.

The post Hilary Benn publishes his Bill to delay Brexit again as Government threatens an election if MPs back it appeared first on BrexitCentral.

A mere few months ago, only those with copies of Erskine May on their bookshelves would have likely known the meaning of prorogation. It burst onto the centre-stage of the public debate framed as a tool by which besuited desperados could force their maleficent policies on us by snatching power away from the legislature. A ludicrous narrative was constructed in which a government could do whatever it wanted by phoning the Queen and asking if she wouldn’t mind awfully sending MPs home for a bit. As should be excruciatingly obvious, this can and will never happen.

Unsurprisingly, then, despite what some seem determined to believe, that is not what the Government is doing now. We have a new Prime Minister, keenly brandishing a fresh domestic agenda, nearly two and a half years into the longest parliamentary session since the English Civil War. Even in a world blissfully free of Brexit discourse and wrangling, those would be excellent and comprehensive reasons why the Government is well within its rights to call a Queen’s Speech. MPs do not have the right to demand the Commons sits on any given day; they have had years to propose anti-No Deal legislation.

Even so, it should come as no great wonder that the Church House Remainer coalition is rather unhappy, as is evidenced by its classless and unimaginative mud-slinging. MPs from all parties hurl straight-faced accusations of a disregard for democracy. This is, of course, despite the fact that the passing of a Queen’s Speech depends on Parliament’s approval. Nonetheless, throw a few references to ‘17.4 million people’ into the irate Remainer tweets and they could almost be a Brexit Party rallying cry.

The most troubling – and concerningly understated – aspect of this uproar is the fact that this rhetoric is being consistently echoed by one John Bercow. Questions have, of course, been repeatedly raised about the Speaker’s ostensible partiality on Brexit, ever since he abandoned his neutrality and told an audience of students in February 2017 that he had voted Remain. Then of course he rewrote Commons rules in January to give his chum Dominic Grieve a leg-up and toss a small but not insignificant spanner into the works of Theresa May’s Brexit plans.

Bercow is edging ever closer to the Remain camp. His condemnation of the Prime Minister’s announcement last week was drowned out by the near-identical censures from the likes of John McDonnell, Jo Swinson, Anna Soubry and Nicola Sturgeon. While they are fully entitled to unreservedly express their view on the Government’s actions, the Speaker is not. The mere fact that he is now consistently saying almost exactly the same things as those MPs is a cause for grave concern. Imagine the shrieks if the reverse were true.

One of the primary objections cited by the Boris-sceptics is the supposed risk of setting a precedent for the use of prorogation to political ends. Remain-leaning Tories in particular have taken to scare-mongering that Jeremy Corbyn could somehow use prorogations for Queen’s Speeches willy-nilly to force through deranged policies of sweeping nationalisation. This is fatuous; the reasons for having one now are ample and extend beyond Brexit. The genuinely disquieting precedent is that of a biased Speaker. It is disturbing in the extreme that we may soon find ourselves with a de facto co-Prime Minister in the Speaker’s chair.

Our parliamentary system only works when the Speaker is of impeccable impartiality. Across the pond, things are done differently; much American political manoeuvring consists of obsessing over the semantics of an ill-important centuries-old text in desperate attempts to discern whether James Madison really meant that everyone should be allowed to carry their six-shooters into Walmart. Our constitution is not codified, nor even written; it walks, talks and, worst of all, thinks.

This undoubtedly grants the Mother of Parliaments a great many advantages over the American structure, but it also brings with it a host of other democratic tripwires, many of which have been catapulted to the fore by Brexit. Bercow sits astride a stallion, hair blowing in the wind, fist raised in a triumphant declaration of power, staring towards Heaven, as he declares unto the people: “I am the Constitution!”

Thankfully, there are checks to the Speaker’s authority. Our structure of government as a whole is rather good at blocking spates of erraticism. What’s more, so far at least, no certifiable craziness has emanated from the Speaker’s chair. But all is not well. However angry he may be, Bercow has no legitimate reason to seek to impede the Queen’s Speech. For now, his conduct is merely “improper”, as the Leader of the House put it.

But the Speakership is the pillar supporting the glorious democratic ceiling above our heads. And that pillar is being determinedly chipped away at as Bercow’s veil of self-restraint rapidly slips away.

Photocredit: ©UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor

The post Speaker Bercow’s increasing partiality on Brexit is a grave constitutional concern appeared first on BrexitCentral.

The House of Commons has just voted by 315 votes to 274 (a majority of 41) for a Lords Amendment to the Northern Ireland (Executive Formation) Bill, which could stop the next Prime Minister proroguing Parliament as a way to enable a no-deal Brexit. The amendment, passed in the House of Lords yesterday by 272 votes to 168 (a majority of 104) will require progress reports on restoring devolved government in Northern Ireland to be debated regularly in Parliament in the autumn.

It is a reminder of the parliamentary arithmetic that the new Prime Minister will have to deal with on taking office next week.

315 MPs voted for the Amendment (317 if you include the two tellers), including 17 Conservative rebels (including Margot James, who resigned as a minister to do so), 235 Labour MPs, 34 SNP MPs, 12 Lib Dem MPs, along with MPs from Plaid Cymru, the Independent Group for Change, the Green Party and 10 further Independents.

Meanwhile, 274 MPs voted against the Amendment (276 including two tellers), including 264 Conservatives, 1 Labour MP, all 10 DUP MPs and 1 Independent.

There were no fewer than 30 Conservative MPs abstaining, including a number of serving Cabinet ministers sceptical about a no-deal Brexit, although it is impossible to know from the division lists whether they were deliberate abstentions or if the MPs were on parliamentary business elsewhere or were maybe “paired” with an absent Opposition MP.

Responding to the vote, a Downing Street spokesman said:

“The Prime Minister is obviously disappointed that a number of Ministers failed to vote in this afternoon’s division. No doubt her successor will take this into account when forming their government.”

Below are full lists of which MPs voted for the Amendment, those who did not vote at all and of course the full list of those who voted against the Amendment.

THE 317 MPs WHO SUPPORTED THE LORDS AMENDMENT

 

 

Conservative

  1. Guto Bebb
  2. Steve Brine
  3. Alistair Burt
  4. Jonathan Djanogly
  5. Justine Greening
  6. Dominic Grieve
  7. Sam Gyimah
  8. Richard Harrington
  9. Margot James
  10. Phillip Lee
  11. Jeremy Lefroy
  12. Oliver Letwin
  13. Paul Masterton
  14. Sarah Newton
  15. Antoinette Sandbach
  16. Keith Simpson
  17. Ed Vaizey

Green

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. Luciana Berger
  3. Nick Boles
  4. Sylvia Hermon
  5. Kelvin Hopkins
  6. Stephen Lloyd
  7. Gavin Shuker
  8. Angela Smith
  9. Sarah Wollaston
  10. John Woodcock

Independent Group for Change

  1. Mike Gapes
  2. Chris Leslie
  3. Joan Ryan
  4. Anna Soubry

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Adrian Bailey
  9. Kevin Barron
  10. Margaret Beckett
  11. Hilary Benn
  12. Clive Betts
  13. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  14. Paul Blomfield
  15. Tracy Brabin
  16. Ben Bradshaw
  17. Kevin Brennan
  18. Lyn Brown
  19. Nick Brown
  20. Chris Bryant
  21. Karen Buck
  22. Richard Burden
  23. Richard Burgon
  24. Dawn Butler
  25. Liam Byrne
  26. Ruth Cadbury
  27. Alan Campbell
  28. Dan Carden
  29. Sarah Champion
  30. Jenny Chapman
  31. Bambos Charalambous
  32. Ann Clwyd
  33. Vernon Coaker
  34. Julie Cooper
  35. Rosie Cooper
  36. Yvette Cooper
  37. Jeremy Corbyn
  38. Neil Coyle
  39. David Crausby
  40. Mary Creagh
  41. Stella Creasy
  42. Jon Cruddas
  43. John Cryer
  44. Judith Cummings
  45. Alex Cunningham
  46. Jim Cunningham
  47. Janet Daby
  48. Nic Dakin (Teller)
  49. Wayne David
  50. Geraint Davies
  51. Marsha De Cordova
  52. Gloria de Piero
  53. Thangam Debbonaire (Teller)
  54. Emma Dent Coad
  55. Tan Dhesi
  56. Annaliese Dodds
  57. Stephen Doughty
  58. Peter Dowd
  59. David Drew
  60. Jack Dromey
  61. Rosie Duffield
  62. Angela Eagle
  63. Maria Eagle
  64. Clive Efford
  65. Julie Elliott
  66. Louise Ellman
  67. Chris Elmore
  68. Bill Esterson
  69. Christopher Evans
  70. Jim Fitzpatrick
  71. Colleen Fletcher
  72. Caroline Flint
  73. Lisa Forbes
  74. Yvonne Fovargue
  75. Vicky Foxcroft
  76. James Frith
  77. Gill Furniss
  78. Hugh Gaffney
  79. Barry Gardiner
  80. Ruth George
  81. Preet Gill
  82. Mary Glindon
  83. Roger Godsiff
  84. Helen Goodman
  85. Kate Green
  86. Lilian Greenwood
  87. Margaret Greenwood
  88. Nia Griffith
  89. John Grogan
  90. Andrew Gwynne
  91. Louise Haigh
  92. Fabian Hamilton
  93. David Hanson
  94. Emma Hardy
  95. Harriet Harman
  96. Carolyn Harris
  97. Helen Hayes
  98. Sue Hayman
  99. John Healey
  100. Mark Hendrick
  101. Mike Hill
  102. Meg Hillier
  103. Margaret Hodge
  104. Sharon Hodgson
  105. Kate Hollern
  106. George Howarth
  107. Rupa Huq
  108. Imran Hussain
  109. Dan Jarvis
  110. Diana Johnson
  111. Darren Jones
  112. Gerald Jones
  113. Graham Jones
  114. Helen Jones
  115. Kevan Jones
  116. Ruth Jones
  117. Sarah Jones
  118. Susan Elan Jones
  119. Michael Kane
  120. Barbara Keeley
  121. Elizabeth Kendall
  122. Afzal Khan
  123. Gerard Killen
  124. Stephen Kinnock
  125. Peter Kyle
  126. Lesley Laird
  127. David Lammy
  128. Ian Lavery
  129. Karen Lee
  130. Emma Lewell-Buck
  131. Clive Lewis
  132. Tony Lloyd
  133. Rebecca Long-Bailey
  134. Ian Lucas
  135. Holly Lynch
  136. Justin Madders
  137. Khalid Mahmood
  138. Shabana Mahmood
  139. Seema Malhotra
  140. Gordon Marsden
  141. Sandy Martin
  142. Rachael Maskell
  143. Chris Matheson
  144. Steve McCabe
  145. Kerry McCarthy
  146. Siobhain McDonagh
  147. Andy McDonald
  148. John McDonnell
  149. Pat McFadden
  150. Alison McGovern
  151. Liz McInnes
  152. Catherine McKinnell
  153. Jim McMahon
  154. Anna McMorrin
  155. Ian Mearns
  156. Ed Miliband
  157. Madeleine Moon
  158. Jessica Morden
  159. Stephen Morgan
  160. Grahame Morris
  161. Ian Murray
  162. Lisa Nandy
  163. Alex Norris
  164. Melanie Onn
  165. Chi Onwurah
  166. Kate Osamor
  167. Albert Owen
  168. Stephanie Peacock
  169. Teresa Pearce
  170. Matthew Pennycook
  171. Toby Perkins
  172. Jess Phillips
  173. Bridget Phillipson
  174. Laura Pidcock
  175. Jo Platt
  176. Luke Pollard
  177. Stephen Pound
  178. Lucy Powell
  179. Yasmin Qureshi
  180. Faisal Rashid
  181. Angela Rayner
  182. Steve Reed
  183. Christina Rees
  184. Ellie Reeves
  185. Rachel Reeves
  186. Emma Reynolds
  187. Jonathan Reynolds
  188. Marie Rimmer
  189. Geoffrey Robinson
  190. Matt Rodda
  191. Danielle Rowley
  192. Chris Ruane
  193. Naz Shah
  194. Virendra Sharma
  195. Barry Sheerman
  196. Paula Sherriff
  197. Tulip Siddiq
  198. Dennis Skinner
  199. Andy Slaughter
  200. Ruth Smeeth
  201. Cat Smith
  202. Eleanor Smith
  203. Jeff Smith
  204. Laura Smith
  205. Nick Smith
  206. Owen Smith
  207. Karin Smyth
  208. Gareth Snell
  209. Alex Sobel
  210. John Spellar
  211. Keir Starmer
  212. Jo Stevens
  213. Wes Streeting
  214. Graham Stringer
  215. Paul Sweeney
  216. Gareth Thomas
  217. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  218. Emily Thornberry
  219. Stephen Timms
  220. Anna Turley
  221. Karl Turner
  222. Derek Twigg
  223. Liz Twist
  224. Keith Vaz
  225. Valerie Vaz
  226. Thelma Walker
  227. Tom Watson
  228. Catherine West
  229. Matt Western
  230. Alan Whitehead
  231. Martin Whitfield
  232. Paul Williams
  233. Phil Wilson
  234. Mohammad Yasin
  235. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Ed Davey
  5. Tim Farron
  6. Wera Hobhouse
  7. Christine Jardine
  8. Norman Lamb
  9. Layla Moran
  10. Jamie Stone
  11. Jo Swinson
  12. Chuka Umunna

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

SNP

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Doug Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Stewart McDonald
  25. Stuart McDonald
  26. John McNally
  27. Carol Monaghan
  28. Gavin Newlands
  29. Brendan O’Hara
  30. Tommy Sheppard
  31. Chris Stephens
  32. Alison Thewliss
  33. Philippa Whitford
  34. Pete Wishart

THE 45 MPs WHO DID NOT VOTE IN THE DIVISION*

 

 

Conservative

  1. Richard Benyon
  2. Peter Bottomley
  3. Karen Bradley
  4. Graham Brady
  5. Greg Clark
  6. Ken Clarke
  7. Alan Duncan
  8. Vicky Ford
  9. David Gauke
  10. Cheryl Gillan
  11. Zac Goldsmith
  12. Damian Green
  13. Philip Hammond
  14. Stephen Hammond
  15. John Hayes
  16. Simon Hoare
  17. Jeremy Hunt
  18. Caroline Johnson
  19. Gillian Keegan
  20. Pauline Latham
  21. Huw Merriman
  22. Anne Milton
  23. Bob Neill
  24. Matthew Offord
  25. Victoria Prentis
  26. Nicholas Soames
  27. Caroline Spelman
  28. Rory Stewart
  29. Julian Sturdy
  30. Tom Tugendhat

Independent

  1. Frank Field
  2. Ivan Lewis
  3. Jared O’Mara
  4. Chris Williamson

Independent Group for Change

  1. Ann Coffey

Labour

  1. Ronnie Campbell
  2. Paul Farrelly
  3. Stephen Hepburn
  4. John Mann
  5. Conor McGinn
  6. Lloyd Russel-Moyle
  7. Mark Tami
  8. Jon Trickett
  9. Stephen Twigg

SNP

  1. Angus MacNeil

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats. NB: Absence from the division may be for a number of reasons, such as being ill, on parliamentary business elsewhere, as well as a deliberate abstention. The Brecon and Radnorshire seat is currently vacant pending a by-election.

THE 276 MPs WHO OPPOSED THE AMENDMENT=============

 

Conservative

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Bim Afolami
  3. Adam Afriyie
  4. Peter Aldous
  5. Lucy Allan
  6. David Amess
  7. Stuart Andrew
  8. Edward Argar
  9. Victoria Atkins
  10. Richard Bacon
  11. Kemi Badenoch
  12. Steve Baker
  13. Harriett Baldwin
  14. Steve Barclay
  15. John Baron
  16. Henry Bellingham
  17. Paul Beresford
  18. Jake Berry
  19. Bob Blackman
  20. Crispin Blunt
  21. Peter Bone
  22. Andrew Bowie
  23. Ben Bradley
  24. Suella Braverman
  25. Jack Brereton
  26. Andrew Bridgen
  27. James Brokenshire
  28. Fiona Bruce
  29. Robert Buckland
  30. Alex Burghart
  31. Conor Burns
  32. Alun Cairns
  33. James Cartlidge
  34. William Cash
  35. Maria Caulfield
  36. Alex Chalk
  37. Rehman Chishti
  38. Christopher Chope
  39. Jo Churchill
  40. Colin Clark
  41. Simon Clarke
  42. James Cleverly
  43. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  44. Thérèse Coffey
  45. Damian Collins
  46. Alberto Costa
  47. Robert Courts
  48. Geoffrey Cox
  49. Stephen Crabb
  50. Tracey Crouch
  51. David Davies
  52. Glyn Davies
  53. Mims Davies
  54. Philip Davies
  55. David Davis
  56. Caroline Dinenage
  57. Leo Docherty
  58. Michelle Donelan
  59. Nadine Dorries
  60. Steve Double
  61. Oliver Dowden
  62. Jackie Doyle-Price
  63. Richard Drax
  64. James Duddridge
  65. David Duguid
  66. Iain Duncan Smith
  67. Philip Dunne
  68. Michael Ellis
  69. Tobias Ellwood
  70. Charlie Elphicke
  71. George Eustice
  72. Nigel Evans
  73. David Evennett
  74. Michael Fabricant
  75. Michael Fallon
  76. Mark Field
  77. Kevin Foster
  78. Liam Fox
  79. Mark Francois
  80. Lucy Frazer
  81. George Freeman
  82. Mike Freer
  83. Marcus Fysh
  84. Roger Gale
  85. Mark Garnier
  86. Nusrat Ghani
  87. Nick Gibb
  88. John Glen
  89. Robert Goodwill
  90. Michael Gove
  91. Luke Graham
  92. Richard Graham
  93. Bill Grant
  94. Helen Grant
  95. James Gray
  96. Chris Grayling
  97. Chris Green
  98. Andrew Griffiths
  99. Kirstene Hair
  100. Robert Halfon
  101. Luke Hall
  102. Matt Hancock
  103. Greg Hands
  104. Mark Harper
  105. Rebecca Harris
  106. Trudy Harrison
  107. Simon Hart
  108. Oliver Heald
  109. James Heappey
  110. Chris Heaton-Harris
  111. Peter Heaton-Jones
  112. Gordon Henderson
  113. Nick Herbert
  114. Damian Hinds
  115. George Hollingbery
  116. Kevin Hollinrake
  117. Philip Hollobone
  118. Adam Holloway
  119. John Howell
  120. Nigel Huddleston
  121. Eddie Hughes
  122. Nick Hurd
  123. Alister Jack
  124. Sajid Javid
  125. Ranil Jayawardena
  126. Bernard Jenkin
  127. Andrea Jenkyns
  128. Robert Jenrick
  129. Boris Johnson
  130. Gareth Johnson
  131. Jo Johnson
  132. Andrew Jones
  133. David Jones
  134. Marcus Jones
  135. Daniel Kawczynski
  136. Seema Kennedy
  137. Stephen Kerr
  138. Sir Greg Knight
  139. Julian Knight
  140. Kwasi Kwarteng
  141. John Lamont
  142. Mark Lancaster
  143. Andrea Leadsom
  144. Edward Leigh
  145. Andrew Lewer
  146. Brandon Lewis
  147. Julian Lewis
  148. Ian Liddell-Grainger
  149. David Lidington
  150. Julia Lopez
  151. Jack Lopresti
  152. Jonathan Lord
  153. Tim Loughton
  154. Craig Mackinlay
  155. Rachel Maclean
  156. Anne Main
  157. Alan Mak
  158. Kit Malthouse
  159. Scott Mann
  160. Theresa May
  161. Paul Maynard
  162. Patrick McLoughlin
  163. Stephen McPartland
  164. Esther McVey
  165. Mark Menzies
  166. Johnny Mercer
  167. Stephen Metcalfe
  168. Maria Miller
  169. Amanda Milling
  170. Nigel Mills
  171. Andrew Mitchell
  172. Damien Moore
  173. Penny Mordaunt
  174. Nicky Morgan
  175. Anne Marie Morris
  176. David Morris
  177. James Morris
  178. Wendy Morton
  179. David Mundell
  180. Sheryll Murray
  181. Andrew Murrison
  182. Caroline Nokes
  183. Jesse Norman
  184. Neil O’Brien
  185. Guy Opperman
  186. Neil Parish
  187. Priti Patel
  188. Owen Paterson
  189. Mark Pawsey
  190. Mike Penning
  191. John Penrose
  192. Andrew Percy
  193. Claire Perry
  194. Chris Philp
  195. Christopher Pincher
  196. Daniel Poulter
  197. Rebecca Pow
  198. Mark Prisk
  199. Mark Pritchard
  200. Tom Pursglove
  201. Jeremy Quin (Teller)
  202. Will Quince
  203. Dominic Raab
  204. John Redwood
  205. Jacob Rees-Mogg
  206. Laurence Robertson
  207. Mary Robinson
  208. Andrew Rosindell
  209. Douglas Ross
  210. Lee Rowley
  211. Amber Rudd
  212. David Rutley
  213. Paul Scully
  214. Bob Seely
  215. Andrew Selous
  216. Grant Shapps
  217. Alok Sharma
  218. Alec Shelbrooke
  219. Chris Skidmore
  220. Chloe Smith
  221. Henry Smith
  222. Julian Smith
  223. Royston Smith
  224. Mark Spencer (Teller)
  225. Andrew Stephenson
  226. John Stevenson
  227. Bob Stewart
  228. Iain Stewart
  229. Gary Streeter
  230. Mel Stride
  231. Graham Stuart
  232. Rishi Sunak
  233. Desmond Swayne
  234. Hugo Swire
  235. Robert Syms
  236. Derek Thomas
  237. Ross Thomson
  238. Maggie Throup
  239. Kelly Tolhurst
  240. Justin Tomlinson
  241. Michael Tomlinson
  242. Craig Tracey
  243. David Tredinnick
  244. Anne-Marie Trevelyan
  245. Elizabeth Truss
  246. Shailesh Vara
  247. Martin Vickers
  248. Theresa Villiers
  249. Charles Walker
  250. Robin Walker
  251. Ben Wallace
  252. David Warburton
  253. Matt Warman
  254. Giles Watling
  255. Helen Whately
  256. Heather Wheeler
  257. Craig Whittaker
  258. John Whittingdale
  259. Bill Wiggin
  260. Gavin Williamson
  261. Mike Wood
  262. William Wragg
  263. Jeremy Wright
  264. Nadhim Zahawi

DUP

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Jeffrey Donaldson
  4. Paul Girvan
  5. Emma Little Pengelly
  6. Ian Paisley
  7. Gavin Robinson
  8. Jim Shannon
  9. David Simpson
  10. Sammy Wilson

Independent

  1. Ian Austin

Labour

  1. Kate Hoey

The post Government defeated by a majority of 41 in the Commons on move to prevent prorogation appeared first on BrexitCentral.

For too long we have witnessed this Parliament trying to delay or dilute Brexit. The very institution the British people has trusted to govern us has shown a pathetic reluctance to take on the task. Instead of leading us proudly and sensibly out of the EU, Parliament has served the EU’s interests by making up problem after problem where there is no issue, and exaggerating every complexity. It has been a sorry case of Parliament against the people.

We are now close to the Conservative Party electing a new leader who will be committed to our exit by 31st October. Boris Johnson – who has my support and is likely to win – has told us we will leave then, “do or die”. Jeremy Hunt has shifted closer to saying we must leave by that date. Yet there are still some in the Remain-supporting media who trot out the falsehood that as there is no majority for a so-called no-deal exit, Parliament will not allow such a departure.

The first thing to grasp is there is no such thing as a no-deal exit. Despite the weak and lacklustre negotiation conducted by Mrs May, there are various agreements and arrangements ready for our exit without signing the Withdrawal Treaty. There are haulage, customs, government procurement and aviation agreements and arrangements. The EU has set out how they will handle such an exit, and the UK Government says they too are ready, after three years to prepare for just such an eventuality.

There is no great problem with the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland/EU. It is today a complex border, with different rates and coverage of VAT and Excise taxes, and different currencies. The necessary calculations and payments for most trade are not made at the border, but by computer away from the border with settlement to the relevant tax authorities against electronic manifests of the consignment. So too could any tariffs and customs adjustments be done. There is no UK need to put new barriers and impediments on the border once we leave.

How could Parliament seek to prevent exit without the Withdrawal Treaty? Some say Parliament could pass a motion to condemn a so called “no-deal” exit. As we are due to leave in both UK and EU law, a motion would not trump that legal obligation. There would also be a need to define a “no-deal exit”. Some say the forces of the Opposition could somehow grab control of parliamentary business and pass an Act of Parliament amending UK law to delay or cancel our exit. It is difficult to see how. Of course, a parliamentary process to repeal the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act and the EU Withdrawal Act could keep us in the EU, but I do not believe even this Parliament would dare to try that or have a majority to do so.

Parliament would need to take down the Government first anyway, assuming a government still hostile to the idea of staying in against the results of the referendum. Parliament would then need to form a pro-EU government, establish a majority for the repeal, argue and vote it through against strong opposition and ignore the hostile response of the public who expect Labour and Conservative MPs to fulfil their manifesto pledges to get us out.

It is important to grasp that EU law is superior to UK law. As we are leaving in EU law on 31st October, that can only be stopped by amending the EU law as well as the UK law. Mrs May delayed our exit because she wanted to. The Prime Minister can request a delay to our exit, and will get one if the EU consents. That is how EU law was changed to keep us in from April to October. Assuming a Prime Minister is determined to get us out, there will be no request for delay and therefore no further delay.

Could Parliament instruct the Prime Minister to request a delay? That too would be difficult with a determined Prime Minster. The Government controls the Order Paper, moves money resolutions and possesses Crown prerogative. These are all necessary for the passage of legislation. Nor could Parliament require delay, as it is a deal between the UK Government and the EU. They can only require the Prime Minister to seek a delay, not mandate a delay.

My conclusion is that a determined Prime Minister can get us out.

The post A determined Prime Minister can ensure we are out of the EU by 31st October appeared first on BrexitCentral.

The House of Commons this afternoon voted by 309 votes to 298 – a majority of 11 – to defeat the latest attempt by MPs to seize control of the parliamentary agenda as part of a ploy to prevent a no-deal Brexit.

The motion – debated during time allocated for a Labour Opposition Day debate – proposed handing control of the Order Paper to MPs on Tuesday 25th June and, if passed, would have given MPs the chance to introduce legislation aimed at preventing a no-deal Brexit at the end of October and/or stopping a future Prime Minister proroguing Parliament as a way of ensuring the delivery of a no-deal Brexit.

The motion was tabled by Jeremy Corbyn and formally backed by the other opposition parties in Parliament – the SNP, Lib Dems, Plaid Cymru, the Greens and the now diminished Change UK – as well as Tory backbencher Sir Oliver Letwin.

298 MPs voted for the motion (300 if you include the two tellers), including 10 Conservative rebels, 224 Labour MPs, all 35 SNP MPs, all 11 Lib Dem MPs, along with MPs from Plaid Cymru, Change UK , the Green Party and 10 Independents.

But 309 MPs voted against the motion (311 including two tellers), including 291 Conservatives, 8 Labour rebels, all 10 DUP MPs and two Independents.

A further 28 MPs did not participate in the division.

Below are full lists of which MPs voted for the motion, those who did not vote at all (although NB it is impossible to know whether they deliberately abstained, were away from Westminster on parliamentary business elsewhere or were ill etc.) and of course the full list of those who voted against the motion.

THE 300 MPs WHO SUPPORTED THE MOTION===============

 

Change UK

  1. Ann Coffey
  2. Mike Gapes
  3. Chris Leslie
  4. Joan Ryan
  5. Anna Soubry

Conservative

  1. Guto Bebb
  2. Ken Clarke
  3. Jonathan Djanogly
  4. Justine Greening
  5. Dominic Grieve
  6. Sam Gyimah
  7. Phillip Lee
  8. Oliver Letwin
  9. Antoinette Sandbach
  10. Caroline Spelman

Green

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. Luciana Berger
  3. Nick Boles
  4. Sylvia Hermon
  5. Stephen Lloyd
  6. Gavin Shuker
  7. Chuka Umunna
  8. Chris Williamson
  9. Sarah Wollaston
  10. John Woodcock

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Adrian Bailey
  9. Margaret Beckett
  10. Hilary Benn
  11. Clive Betts
  12. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  13. Paul Blomfield
  14. Tracy Brabin
  15. Ben Bradshaw
  16. Kevin Brennan
  17. Lyn Brown
  18. Nick Brown
  19. Chris Bryant
  20. Karen Buck
  21. Richard Burden
  22. Richard Burgon
  23. Dawn Butler
  24. Liam Byrne
  25. Ruth Cadbury
  26. Alan Campbell
  27. Dan Carden
  28. Sarah Champion
  29. Jenny Chapman
  30. Bambos Charalambous
  31. Ann Clwyd
  32. Vernon Coaker
  33. Julie Cooper
  34. Rosie Cooper
  35. Yvette Cooper
  36. Jeremy Corbyn
  37. Neil Coyle
  38. David Crausby
  39. Mary Creagh
  40. Stella Creasy
  41. Jon Cruddas
  42. John Cryer
  43. Judith Cummings
  44. Alex Cunningham
  45. Jim Cunningham
  46. Janet Daby
  47. Nic Dakin (Teller)
  48. Wayne David
  49. Geraint Davies
  50. Marsha De Cordova
  51. Gloria de Piero
  52. Thangam Debbonaire
  53. Emma Dent Coad
  54. Tan Dhesi
  55. Annaliese Dodds
  56. Stephen Doughty
  57. Peter Dowd
  58. David Drew
  59. Jack Dromey
  60. Rosie Duffield
  61. Angela Eagle
  62. Maria Eagle
  63. Louise Ellman
  64. Chris Elmore
  65. Bill Esterson
  66. Christopher Evans
  67. Colleen Fletcher
  68. Lisa Forbes
  69. Yvonne Fovargue
  70. Vicky Foxcroft
  71. James Frith
  72. Gill Furniss
  73. Barry Gardiner
  74. Ruth George
  75. Preet Gill
  76. Mary Glindon
  77. Roger Godsiff
  78. Helen Goodman
  79. Kate Green
  80. Lilian Greenwood
  81. Margaret Greenwood
  82. Nia Griffith
  83. John Grogan
  84. Andrew Gwynne
  85. Louise Haigh
  86. Fabian Hamilton
  87. David Hanson
  88. Emma Hardy
  89. Harriet Harman
  90. Carolyn Harris
  91. Helen Hayes
  92. Sue Hayman
  93. John Healey
  94. Mark Hendrick
  95. Mike Hill
  96. Meg Hillier
  97. Margaret Hodge
  98. Sharon Hodgson
  99. Kate Hollern
  100. George Howarth
  101. Rupa Huq
  102. Dan Jarvis
  103. Diana Johnson
  104. Darren Jones
  105. Gerald Jones
  106. Graham Jones
  107. Helen Jones
  108. Kevan Jones
  109. Ruth Jones
  110. Sarah Jones
  111. Susan Elan Jones
  112. Michael Kane
  113. Elizabeth Kendall
  114. Afzal Khan
  115. Gerard Killen
  116. Stephen Kinnock
  117. Peter Kyle
  118. Lesley Laird
  119. David Lammy
  120. Ian Lavery
  121. Karen Lee
  122. Emma Lewell-Buck
  123. Clive Lewis
  124. Tony Lloyd
  125. Rebecca Long-Bailey
  126. Holly Lynch
  127. Justin Madders
  128. Khalid Mahmood
  129. Shabana Mahmood
  130. Seema Malhotra
  131. Sandy Martin
  132. Rachael Maskell
  133. Chris Matheson
  134. Steve McCabe
  135. Kerry McCarthy
  136. Siobhain McDonagh
  137. Andy McDonald
  138. John McDonnell
  139. Pat McFadden
  140. Conor McGinn
  141. Alison McGovern
  142. Liz McInnes
  143. Catherine McKinnell
  144. Jim McMahon
  145. Anna McMorrin
  146. Ian Mearns
  147. Ed Miliband
  148. Madeleine Moon
  149. Jessica Morden
  150. Stephen Morgan
  151. Grahame Morris
  152. Ian Murray
  153. Lisa Nandy
  154. Alex Norris
  155. Chi Onwurah
  156. Kate Osamor
  157. Albert Owen
  158. Stephanie Peacock
  159. Teresa Pearce
  160. Matthew Pennycook
  161. Toby Perkins
  162. Jess Phillips
  163. Bridget Phillipson
  164. Laura Pidcock
  165. Jo Platt
  166. Luke Pollard
  167. Stephen Pound
  168. Lucy Powell
  169. Yasmin Qureshi
  170. Faisal Rashid
  171. Angela Rayner
  172. Steve Reed
  173. Christina Rees
  174. Ellie Reeves
  175. Rachel Reeves
  176. Emma Reynolds
  177. Jonathan Reynolds
  178. Marie Rimmer
  179. Geoffrey Robinson
  180. Matt Rodda
  181. Danielle Rowley
  182. Chris Ruane
  183. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
  184. Naz Shah
  185. Virendra Sharma
  186. Barry Sheerman
  187. Paula Sherriff
  188. Tulip Siddiq
  189. Dennis Skinner
  190. Andy Slaughter
  191. Cat Smith
  192. Eleanor Smith
  193. Jeff Smith
  194. Laura Smith
  195. Nick Smith (Teller)
  196. Owen Smith
  197. Karin Smyth
  198. Alex Sobel
  199. John Spellar
  200. Keir Starmer
  201. Wes Streeting
  202. Paul Sweeney
  203. Mark Tami
  204. Gareth Thomas
  205. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  206. Emily Thornberry
  207. Stephen Timms
  208. Jon Trickett
  209. Anna Turley
  210. Karl Turner
  211. Stephen Twigg
  212. Liz Twist
  213. Keith Vaz
  214. Valerie Vaz
  215. Thelma Walker
  216. Tom Watson
  217. Catherine West
  218. Matt Western
  219. Alan Whitehead
  220. Martin Whitfield
  221. Paul Williams
  222. Phil Wilson
  223. Mohammad Yasin
  224. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Ed Davey
  5. Tim Farron
  6. Wera Hobhouse
  7. Christine Jardine
  8. Norman Lamb
  9. Layla Moran
  10. Jamie Stone
  11. Jo Swinson

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

SNP

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Doug Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Angus MacNeil
  25. Stewart McDonald
  26. Stuart McDonald
  27. John McNally
  28. Carol Monaghan
  29. Gavin Newlands
  30. Brendan O’Hara
  31. Tommy Sheppard
  32. Chris Stephens
  33. Alison Thewliss
  34. Philippa Whitford
  35. Pete Wishart

THE 28 MPs WHO DID NOT VOTE IN THE DIVISION*=======

 

Conservative

  1. John Baron
  2. Karen Bradley
  3. Damian Collins
  4. Richard Harrington
  5. Julian Knight
  6. Johnny Mercer
  7. Matthew Offord
  8. Claire Perry
  9. Bob Stewart
  10. Ed Vaizey
  11. Giles Watling

Independent

  1. Frank Field
  2. Kelvin Hopkins
  3. Jared O’Mara
  4. Angela Smith

Labour

  1. Clive Efford
  2. Julie Elliott
  3. Paul Farrelly
  4. Hugh Gaffney
  5. Imran Hussain
  6. Barbara Keeley
  7. Ian Lucas
  8. Gordon Marsden
  9. Melanie Onn
  10. Ruth Smeeth
  11. Gareth Snell
  12. Jo Stevens
  13. Derek Twigg

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats. NB: Absence from the division may be for a number of reasons, such as being ill, on parliamentary business elsewhere, as well as a deliberate abstention.

THE 311 MPs WHO OPPOSED THE MOTION==============

 

Conservative

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Bim Afolami
  3. Adam Afriyie
  4. Peter Aldous
  5. Lucy Allan
  6. David Amess
  7. Stuart Andrew
  8. Edward Argar
  9. Victoria Atkins
  10. Richard Bacon
  11. Kemi Badenoch
  12. Steve Baker
  13. Harriett Baldwin
  14. Steve Barclay
  15. Henry Bellingham
  16. Richard Benyon
  17. Paul Beresford
  18. Jake Berry
  19. Bob Blackman
  20. Crispin Blunt
  21. Peter Bone
  22. Peter Bottomley
  23. Andrew Bowie
  24. Ben Bradley
  25. Graham Brady
  26. Suella Braverman
  27. Jack Brereton
  28. Andrew Bridgen
  29. Steve Brine
  30. James Brokenshire
  31. Fiona Bruce
  32. Robert Buckland
  33. Alex Burghart
  34. Conor Burns
  35. Alistair Burt
  36. Alun Cairns
  37. James Cartlidge
  38. William Cash
  39. Maria Caulfield
  40. Alex Chalk
  41. Rehman Chishti
  42. Christopher Chope
  43. Jo Churchill
  44. Greg Clark
  45. Colin Clark
  46. Simon Clarke
  47. James Cleverly
  48. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  49. Thérèse Coffey
  50. Alberto Costa
  51. Robert Courts
  52. Geoffrey Cox
  53. Stephen Crabb
  54. Tracey Crouch
  55. Chris Davies
  56. David Davies
  57. Glyn Davies
  58. Mims Davies
  59. Philip Davies
  60. David Davis
  61. Caroline Dinenage
  62. Leo Docherty
  63. Michelle Donelan
  64. Nadine Dorries
  65. Steve Double
  66. Oliver Dowden
  67. Jackie Doyle-Price
  68. Richard Drax
  69. James Duddridge
  70. David Duguid
  71. Alan Duncan
  72. Iain Duncan Smith
  73. Philip Dunne
  74. Michael Ellis
  75. Tobias Ellwood
  76. Charlie Elphicke
  77. George Eustice
  78. Nigel Evans
  79. David Evennett
  80. Michael Fabricant
  81. Michael Fallon
  82. Mark Field
  83. Vicky Ford
  84. Kevin Foster
  85. Liam Fox
  86. Mark Francois
  87. Lucy Frazer
  88. George Freeman
  89. Mike Freer
  90. Marcus Fysh
  91. Roger Gale
  92. Mark Garnier
  93. David Gauke
  94. Nusrat Ghani
  95. Nick Gibb
  96. Cheryl Gillan
  97. John Glen
  98. Zac Goldsmith
  99. Robert Goodwill
  100. Michael Gove
  101. Luke Graham
  102. Richard Graham
  103. Bill Grant
  104. Helen Grant
  105. James Gray
  106. Chris Grayling
  107. Chris Green
  108. Damian Green
  109. Andrew Griffiths
  110. Kirstene Hair
  111. Robert Halfon
  112. Luke Hall
  113. Philip Hammond
  114. Stephen Hammond
  115. Matt Hancock
  116. Greg Hands
  117. Mark Harper
  118. Rebecca Harris
  119. Trudy Harrison
  120. Simon Hart
  121. John Hayes
  122. Oliver Heald
  123. James Heappey
  124. Chris Heaton-Harris
  125. Peter Heaton-Jones
  126. Gordon Henderson
  127. Nick Herbert
  128. Damian Hinds
  129. Simon Hoare
  130. George Hollingbery
  131. Kevin Hollinrake
  132. Philip Hollobone
  133. Adam Holloway
  134. John Howell
  135. Nigel Huddleston
  136. Eddie Hughes
  137. Jeremy Hunt
  138. Nick Hurd
  139. Alister Jack
  140. Margot James
  141. Sajid Javid
  142. Ranil Jayawardena
  143. Bernard Jenkin
  144. Andrea Jenkyns
  145. Robert Jenrick
  146. Boris Johnson
  147. Caroline Johnson
  148. Gareth Johnson
  149. Jo Johnson
  150. Andrew Jones
  151. David Jones
  152. Marcus Jones
  153. Daniel Kawczynski
  154. Gillian Keegan
  155. Seema Kennedy
  156. Stephen Kerr
  157. Sir Greg Knight
  158. Kwasi Kwarteng
  159. John Lamont
  160. Mark Lancaster
  161. Pauline Latham
  162. Andrea Leadsom
  163. Jeremy Lefroy
  164. Edward Leigh
  165. Andrew Lewer
  166. Brandon Lewis
  167. Julian Lewis
  168. Ian Liddell-Grainger
  169. David Lidington
  170. Julia Lopez
  171. Jack Lopresti
  172. Jonathan Lord
  173. Tim Loughton
  174. Craig Mackinlay
  175. Rachel Maclean
  176. Anne Main
  177. Alan Mak
  178. Kit Malthouse
  179. Scott Mann
  180. Paul Masterson
  181. Theresa May
  182. Paul Maynard
  183. Patrick McLoughlin
  184. Stephen McPartland
  185. Esther McVey
  186. Mark Menzies
  187. Huw Merriman
  188. Stephen Metcalfe
  189. Maria Miller
  190. Amanda Milling
  191. Nigel Mills
  192. Anne Milton
  193. Andrew Mitchell
  194. Damien Moore
  195. Penny Mordaunt
  196. Nicky Morgan
  197. Anne Marie Morris
  198. David Morris
  199. James Morris
  200. Wendy Morton (Teller)
  201. David Mundell
  202. Sheryll Murray
  203. Andrew Murrison
  204. Bob Neill
  205. Sarah Newton
  206. Caroline Nokes
  207. Jesse Norman
  208. Neil O’Brien
  209. Guy Opperman
  210. Neil Parish
  211. Priti Patel
  212. Owen Paterson
  213. Mark Pawsey
  214. Mike Penning
  215. John Penrose
  216. Andrew Percy
  217. Chris Philp
  218. Christopher Pincher
  219. Daniel Poulter
  220. Rebecca Pow
  221. Victoria Prentis
  222. Mark Prisk
  223. Mark Pritchard
  224. Tom Pursglove
  225. Jeremy Quin
  226. Will Quince
  227. Dominic Raab
  228. John Redwood
  229. Jacob Rees-Mogg
  230. Laurence Robertson
  231. Mary Robinson
  232. Andrew Rosindell
  233. Douglas Ross
  234. Lee Rowley
  235. Amber Rudd
  236. David Rutley
  237. Paul Scully
  238. Bob Seely
  239. Andrew Selous
  240. Grant Shapps
  241. Alok Sharma
  242. Alec Shelbrooke
  243. Keith Simpson
  244. Chris Skidmore
  245. Chloe Smith
  246. Henry Smith
  247. Julian Smith
  248. Royston Smith
  249. Nicholas Soames
  250. Mark Spencer
  251. Andrew Stephenson
  252. John Stevenson
  253. Iain Stewart (Teller)
  254. Rory Stewart
  255. Gary Streeter
  256. Mel Stride
  257. Graham Stuart
  258. Julian Sturdy
  259. Rishi Sunak
  260. Desmond Swayne
  261. Hugo Swire
  262. Robert Syms
  263. Derek Thomas
  264. Ross Thomson
  265. Maggie Throup
  266. Kelly Tolhurst
  267. Justin Tomlinson
  268. Michael Tomlinson
  269. Craig Tracey
  270. David Tredinnick
  271. Anne-Marie Trevelyan
  272. Elizabeth Truss
  273. Thomas Tugendhat
  274. Shailesh Vara
  275. Martin Vickers
  276. Theresa Villiers
  277. Charles Walker
  278. Robin Walker
  279. Ben Wallace
  280. David Warburton
  281. Matt Warman
  282. Helen Whately
  283. Heather Wheeler
  284. Craig Whittaker
  285. John Whittingdale
  286. Bill Wiggin
  287. Gavin Williamson
  288. Mike Wood
  289. William Wragg
  290. Jeremy Wright
  291. Nadhim Zahawi

DUP

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Jeffrey Donaldson
  4. Paul Girvan
  5. Emma Little Pengelly
  6. Ian Paisley
  7. Gavin Robinson
  8. Jim Shannon
  9. David Simpson
  10. Sammy Wilson

Independent

  1. Ian Austin
  2. Ivan Lewis

Labour

  1. Kevin Barron
  2. Ronnie Campbell
  3. Jim Fitzpatrick
  4. Caroline Flint
  5. Stephen Hepburn
  6. Kate Hoey
  7. John Mann
  8. Graham Stringer 

The post MPs defeat latest attempt to seize the Commons agenda and scupper Brexit – how every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.




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